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I can't seem to get my code to compile - this is the error I'm getting:

6\problem11.cpp(21): error C2660: 'calcScore' : function does not take 0 arguments

Any help or suggestions in solving this? This is a homework problem and I can't seem to figure out how to fix the error. We're not allowed to use arrays just yet.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

void getJudgeData(int);
void calcScore(float, float, float, float, float);
float findHighest(float, float, float, float, float);
float findLowest(float, float, float, float, float);

    int main()
    {
        getJudgeData(1);
        getJudgeData(2);
        getJudgeData(3);
        getJudgeData(4);
        getJudgeData(5);
        calcScore();

        system("pause");
        return 0;
    }

    void getJudgeData(int jnumber)
{
    float score1, score2, score3, score4, score5;

    switch(jnumber)
    {
        case 1: cout << "\nEnter the score for judge " << jnumber << ". ";
                cin >> score1;
                break;
        case 2: cout << "\nEnter the score for judge " << jnumber << ". ";
                cin >> score2;
                break;
        case 3: cout << "\nEnter the score for judge " << jnumber << ". ";
                cin >> score3;
                break;
        case 4: cout << "\nEnter the score for judge " << jnumber << ". ";
                cin >> score4;
                break;
        case 5: cout << "\nEnter the score for judge " << jnumber << ". ";
                cin >> score5;
                break;
                calcScore(score1, score2, score3, score4, score5);
    }
}

void calcScore(float one, float two, float three, float four, float five)
{
    float high, low, avg;

        high = findHighest(one, two, three, four, five);
        low = findLowest(one, two, three, four, five);

        avg = ((one + two + three + four + five) - (high+low))/3;

        cout << "Final score is: " << avg <<endl;
        return;
}

float findHighest(float high1, float high2, float high3, float high4, float high5) // find highest score 
{
    float high = 10;

        if (high1 > high)
        {
             high1 = high;
        }
        else if ( high2 > high)
        {
             high2 = high;
        }
        else if ( high3 > high)
        {
             high3 = high;
        }
        else if (high4 > high)
        {
             high4 = high;
        }
        else if ( high5 > high)
        {
             high5 =  high;
        }

        return  high;
}

float findLowest (float low1, float low2, float low3, float low4, float low5) // find lowest score
{
    float low = 1;

        if (low1 < low)
        {
            low1 = low;
        }
        else if (low2 < low)
        {
            low2 = low;
        }
        else if (low3 < low)
        {
            low3 = low;
        }
        else if (low4 < low)
        {
            low4 = low;
        }
        else if (low5 < low)
        {
            low5 = low;
        }

        return low;
}
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3  
The compiler has told you exactly what's wrong. You have a function calcScore which is supposed to take 5 floats, and you're calling it (in main) with no parameters. –  Dave Mar 7 '13 at 1:07
    
You may want to consider putting a default case in your switch. What do you expect to happen if I enter 6? Also system("pause"); is not the way to hold the screen. There are a number of choices but that one could be potentially be dangerous to the system. –  BobbyDigital Mar 7 '13 at 1:12
    
Now redo your code to handle the largest of 10 values. Then redo your code to pass an array into your 'find largest' and 'find smallest' functions. Compare the two. And then think about 200 values to be worked with... –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 7 '13 at 1:34
    
Please see my accepted answer note in my answer. –  BobbyDigital Mar 7 '13 at 1:53
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
calcScore();

You cant do this, since the function expects 4 parameters, as the compiler says.

Let me see if i understand what you want to do. Make these changes

float getJudgeData(int jnumber) //return the score
{
    float score; // only one score neeeded

    ...
    //calcScore(score1, score2, score3, score4, score5);
}

You can remove the last calcScore line since

a) it wont be reached anyway, it is after a break statement, within the switch.
b) You will ever have one score at this point.

int main()
{
    float score1, score2, score3, score4, score5;
    score1=getJudgeData(1);
    score2=getJudgeData(2);
    score3=getJudgeData(3);
    score4=getJudgeData(4);
    score5=getJudgeData(5);
    calcScore(score1, score2, score3, score4, score5);
    ...
}

This might just do what you want - get each float, and call calcScore on them.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the homework problem : A particular talent competition has 5 judges, each of whom awards a score between 0 and 10 to each performer. Fractional scores, such as 8.3, are allowed. A performer’s final score is determined by dropping the highest and lowest score received, then average the three remaining scores. Write a program that uses this method to calculate a contestant’s score. It should include the following functions: –  Anna Thpvng Mar 7 '13 at 1:15
    
Void getJudgeData() should ask the user for a judge’s score, store it in a reference parameter variable, and validate it. This function should be called by main once for each of the five judges. Void calcScore() should calculate and display the average of the three scores that remain after dropping the highest and lowest scores the performer received. This function should be called just once by main and should be passed the five scores. The last two functions should be called by calcScore(), which uses the returned information to determine which of the scores to drop. –  Anna Thpvng Mar 7 '13 at 1:16
    
@AnnaThpvng If your homework requires void getJudgeData, then you need to make some changes, else take a look at the changes I suggest. –  Karthik T Mar 7 '13 at 1:30
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You have the line

calcScore();

But the function requires arguments (as declared and defined in the rest of the code).

Add the arguments!

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As your warning warned, and others said, you're calling a function with the incorrect number of arguments.

If there's a need for that you can always overload the function. Which means the new function can be the same as the original but must differ by number or type of arguments. For example:

void someFunc(int a){}
void someFunc(float a){}
void someFunc(int a, int b){}

are all good!

Having said that I'll take a moment to add a little advice that is likely to save you from having to ask additional questions in very short order.

You actually only have local variables, do you realize that? When non-static variables are declared inside a function they will go out of scope(be deleted) when you leave the function. The best thing to do if those variables are not used anywhere else is return a value that you can assign a variable to in main().

float getJudgeData(int jnumber);

Another small thing to think about for the future is the repeating statements that appear in your code. Generally, when this occurs there's always a better way of doing it. Consider that you are giving the same prompt over and over. Can you now think of a more appropriate place for it.

Another puzzling thing is there's only one value passed to the function but you have 5 scores; why? You have one judge enter their score then pass a bunch of junk(variables with unknown data) to calcScore(), which isn't even getting called, but if it did you are guaranteed NOT to get a meaningful value.

Note to accepted answer

What should have probably been pointed out in the accepted answer is there isn't any need to have a switch statement if implemented that way. Pass it the jnumber and...

foat getJudgeData(int jnumber)
{
    float score;
    cout << "\nEnter the score for judge " << jnumber << ". ";
    cin >> score;
    return score;
}
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