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I have a fairly straight forward question, I'm going to be doing a lot of HTTP Requests to get an XML payload and I need to parse the payload and make some changes to a database.

I'm going to be doing these requests pretty frequently so any optimization will be good.

I'm wondering if there is a more efficient way to do the requests as that will take the most amount of time. I'm writing this in Java, I use the SAXParser to parse the XML payload for the data that I need. I'm using the HttpURLConnection class for Http Requests and I just run a thread synchronized and wait for each request. I've tried concurrently running the requests and I run into some issue's. The computer I will be doing this on is very capable so it's not like I will be running into memory or processing issues. So my questions are:

  1. Would it be more efficient to take a hash of the XML payload and store it in the DB or parse the XML and check the data manually?
  2. Is there a more efficient library for HttpRequests than HttpURLConnection?
  3. Can any optimizations be made with threading the requests?

Any insight is appreciated.

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You'll probably benefit from an async http client –  irreputable Mar 7 '13 at 2:07

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Would it be more efficient to take a hash of the XML payload and store it in the DB or parse the XML and check the data manually?

Computing a hash for the XML payload will almost certainly be faster than parsing it. Thats a good way of detecting if you already have a payload that does not need to be re-parsed.

Is there a more efficient library for HttpRequests than HttpURLConnection?

Sure, use Apache HttpComponents. There are several ways to tune it for performance, as highlighted in this legacy but still relevant document.

Can any optimizations be made with threading the requests?

As with all things thread related, this will depend on several factors including your hardware configuration (particularly your network hardware). Theoretically you should gain some benefit from multithreading. I would not make it the number one priority for tuning.

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Thank you very much; I will compute the hash of the payload as well I am using the HttpClient v4 library now and I do see a little bit of improvement. I still think there can be some optimization with threading I have to make 30k requests in the shortest amount of time. If you have any other advice I'd love to hear it. –  Jesse Farebrother Mar 7 '13 at 4:00
    
30k HTTP requests is quite a few. You could parallelize the tasks across a bunch of cheaper server machines. This is because download tasks are not CPU intensive, so utilizing multiple cheap servers to accomplish the task would be better than using a single, powerful server. –  Perception Mar 7 '13 at 4:03
    
That was what I was thinking to I'm bench marking the request and I can do around 80 requests per minute; which would take around 6.25 hours. If I can split that amongst some servers on AWS I should be fine to do this in an hour. Thanks for the help again! –  Jesse Farebrother Mar 7 '13 at 8:57

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