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My code

FOO="dsad; dsadasddas; dadsad; dsdsad asdsdd"
echo "${FOO%%;*}"   
result: dsad

FOO="dsad; dsadasddas; dadsad; dsdsad asdsdd"
echo "${FOO##*;}"
result: dadsad; dsdsad asdsdd

howto print all character for first semicolon?

FOO="dsad; dsadasddas; dadsad; dsdsad asdsdd"
echo "${FOO???}"
result: dsadasddas; dadsad; dsdsad asdsdd

howto print and all character before last semicolon?

FOO="dsad; dsadasddas; dadsad; dsdsad asdsdd"
echo "${FOO???}"
result: dsadasddas; dadsad; dsdsad asdsdd

help anyone? Thank you ;)

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closed as not a real question by Daniel A. White, David W., luser droog, sgarizvi, bipen Mar 7 '13 at 5:29

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
what is your question? –  Daniel A. White Mar 7 '13 at 1:37
    
How to print all character for first semicolon and how to print and all character before last semicolon. Thank –  petr Mar 7 '13 at 1:42
    
What's with the stars that appear and don't appear in the string and the output? –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 7 '13 at 2:28
    
They marked bold text in the original question, but @shellter's edit made them literal. –  that other guy Mar 7 '13 at 2:33
1  
You could have given a better string in example. Eg FOO="sin; cos; tan; cot; sec". Its very hard to interpret your output of echo. –  Kaunteya Mar 7 '13 at 4:24

1 Answer 1

Use # and % instead of ## and %%:

foo='one; two; three; four'

# All characters after first semicolon
echo "${foo#*;}"  # two; three; four

# All characters before last semicolon
echo "${foo%;*}"  # one; two; three

${var##glob} and ${var%%glob} will take away as much as possible (greedy matching). ${var#glob} and ${var%glob} will take away as little as possible (reluctant matching).

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Thank you very much ;) –  petr Mar 7 '13 at 21:15

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