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So just for fun, I have this code snippet:

#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
 int i;
 int a;
 i = 17;
 //scanf("%d", &i);
 a = (i+=5) * (i-=3);
 printf("a is %d, i is %d\n", a, i);
}

In C specifications, it says the order of operands evaluation is undefined, so I was expecting to see either 22 * 19, or 19 * 14. However, the result is 19 * 19:

~ $ gcc a.c
~ $ ./a.out
a is 361, i is 19

I thought about it, and the only explanation I could come up with is that the compiler did a 'delayed' evaluation on (i+=5)'s value, and it thought that (i+=5)'s value is just value of i. same for (i-=3).

However, if I uncomment the scanf():

#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
 int i;
 int a;
 i = 17;
 scanf("%d", &i);
 a = (i+=5) * (i-=3);
 printf("a is %d, i is %d\n", a, i);
}

Now I input 17 at prompt:

~ $ gcc a.c
~ $ ./a.out
17
a is 418, i is 19

Why does it show different behavior?

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3  
Why are you surprised that undefined behaviour results in unpredictable behaviour? –  congusbongus Mar 7 '13 at 2:25
    
It is undefined. It can print 0 for all gcc cares. –  carlosdc Mar 7 '13 at 2:25
    
The behavior is different precisely because said behavior is undefined, as you already noted. –  Code-Apprentice Mar 7 '13 at 2:28
2  
I don't agree with the downvote. This person made an effort to investigate behaviour that they didn't understand, explain it clearly and ask a question. Don't chastise them for not understanding the scope of "undefined behaviour". Note that they expected the order of evaluation to be undefined, but not the entire operation. –  paddy Mar 7 '13 at 2:31
    
If you're having a stressful day, sometimes it's best to take a break from commenting on StackOverflow. –  paddy Mar 7 '13 at 2:56

2 Answers 2

It's Undefined Behavior. The C standard says that you're not allowed to modify the same object (i in this case) more than once between two sequence points (the semicolons before and after the statement, in this case).

Undefined Behavior means anything can happen. It can appear to work correctly. It can give the wrong answer. It can crash your process. It can erase your hard drive. Or it can even set your CPU on fire. These are all allowed behaviors according to the language standard.

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Or it can make you coffee! –  Code-Apprentice Mar 7 '13 at 2:27
    
It can cause a chicken to run around headless, too. +vote if you can find the section of n1570.pdf that renders this UB in the next five minutes, @AdamRosenfield ;) –  undefined behaviour Mar 7 '13 at 2:46

Probably the main difference is that, in your first case, i can be predicted during it's whole lifetime, so the optimizer precomputes it and replaces the variable with a constant value.

In your second example, the scanf makes that optimization impossible. The compiler can't know in advance what will be the value for i and does what you expected, which is undefined by the standard.

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