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So i have this superduper query that finds "related articles" based on the number of tags they have in common with the original article (provided in the $id variable). I don't know if the actual query is important, but here it is Justin Case.

Now, I've never actually used procedures in a live project, but I've read they should be faster, partially because the MySQL engine doesn't need to interpret the code each time. But when i had put this same code in a procedure and called the procedure, the execution was on average about 450 times longer.

Why? Is it because it's returning multiple rows? Do procedures stink at that? Is it because i have to use an input variable in my procedure? 450 is a bunch!

SELECT a.id, a.image, a.title, a.excerpt, a.permalink, COUNT(rel.category_id) AS n
  FROM articles AS a
  JOIN category_relations AS rel ON rel.article_id = a.id
  JOIN categories AS c ON rel.category_id = c.id
 WHERE rel.category_id IN (SELECT category_id 
                             FROM category_relations 
                            WHERE article_id = {$id})
   AND a.id != {$id}
   AND c.type = 1
GROUP BY rel.article_id
ORDER BY n DESC, publish_date DESC
   LIMIT 10

Code used to create the procedure:

DROP PROCEDURE IF EXISTS get_related_articles;
DELIMITER //
CREATE PROCEDURE get_related_articles(IN id INT)
BEGIN
   SELECT   a.id, a.image, a.title, a.excerpt, a.permalink, COUNT(rel.category_id) AS n
   FROM     articles AS a
    JOIN  category_relations AS rel ON rel.article_id = a.id
    JOIN  categories AS c ON rel.category_id = c.id
   WHERE    rel.category_id IN ( SELECT category_id FROM category_relations WHERE article_id = id)
    AND   a.id != id
    AND   c.type = 1
   GROUP BY rel.article_id
   ORDER BY n DESC, publish_date DESC
   LIMIT    10;
END //
DELIMITER ;
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1  
I'm not sure where you heard that they should be faster (what unit are you using to measure 450? 450 camels?). I also don't know who Justin Case is. What is the context that the stored procedure is being called? It seems like you may not be using them correctly. –  Kermit Mar 7 '13 at 3:15
    
Query caching occurs based on the entire query -- that includes the value(s) supplied by your PHP variable. So as the variable changes, the query cache can't be reused. Query caching is also case sensitive. –  OMG Ponies Mar 7 '13 at 3:15
    
@AarolamaBluenk You don't need units for multiplication factors. If you multiplicate a value with just a number, you get the same unit as the original value. Justin Case is a superhero that shows up only when needed (thus - just in case). The context is just "CALL get_related_articles(17232)". This call runs very close to one second, while executing the actualy query runs around 2 ms. –  3Nex Mar 7 '13 at 3:26
    
@3Nex How does the $id fit into your query? Have you actually benchmarked your query? –  Kermit Mar 7 '13 at 3:27
    
@AarolamaBluenk Forgot to say this is a line from the PHP code, so MySQL will get an actual integer –  3Nex Mar 7 '13 at 3:28

2 Answers 2

Not positive on your delay, but IN SUBSELECTS can themselves be costly. Have you thought of doing a join to what is now your sub-select? Also, since the articles table is basis of query, and a.id = rel.article_id, your group by on the "a.id" might be better if available via index.

SELECT 
      a.id, 
      a.image, 
      a.title, 
      a.excerpt, 
      a.permalink
   FROM 
      articles AS a
         JOIN category_relations AS rel 
            ON a.id = rel.article_id 
            JOIN categories AS c 
               ON rel.category_id = c.id
               AND c.type = 1
            JOIN (SELECT category_id 
                     FROM admin_category_relations 
                     WHERE article_id = {$id} ) RelByArticle
               on rel.category_id = RelByArticle.category_id
   WHERE 
      a.id != {$id}
   GROUP BY 
      a.id
   ORDER BY 
      n DESC, 
      publish_date DESC
   LIMIT 10
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How does this answer explain OP's issue of having a slow stored procedure? –  Kermit Mar 7 '13 at 3:29
    
@AarolamaBluenk, you are correct, but sometimes, alternate writing of queries that are better optimized for indexes can just perform better, regardless of other things going on. SOMETIMES, its just a matter of sampling. –  DRapp Mar 7 '13 at 3:32
    
I think the big problem here is that the OP only needs 10 records, yet is fetching complete result sets on the joins. –  Kermit Mar 7 '13 at 3:36
    
Well the execution time of this query as opposed to mine is very much the same, so no improvement there. @AarolamaBluenk's comment, i don't know what i should change to avoid unnecessary result sets? –  3Nex Mar 7 '13 at 3:52
    
You use small sets in your joins... –  Kermit Mar 7 '13 at 3:53

Welcome to the real world of MySQL! Sometimes it's very hard to say why one query executes longer that another. But in your case the answer can be find here:

MySQL doesn't use cache for queries have been called from stored procedures.

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