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First time asking so here we go. Im using Oracle SQL and have a table with the columns

RNUMBER as number, PID as number, VIEWDATE as date, RENTED as char(1)

There are multiple rows with duplicate RNUMBER's but different VIEWDATE's. I am trying to use a query that will display the RNUMBER, PID, first VIEWDATE, last VIEWDATE. It should match RNUMBERS the last VIEWDATE will have a RENTED = 'Y'.

This is the query that I got closest with.

select a.*
from LabDataS13.lookedat a
inner join
  (select RNumber
  from LabDataS13.lookedat
  where RENTED like 'N'
  group by RNumber
  having count(*) > 1) b
on a.RNumber = b.RNumber
where a.RENTED like 'Y'
order by a.RNUMBER

Kind of lost. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Expecting that each rnumber has multiple entries of viewdates and the last viewdate for each rnumber only will have rented='Y' and rest others will not be 'Y'

select a.rnumber,a.pid,first_viewdate,last_viewdate from 
(select rnumber,pid,viewdate as last_viewdate from table where rented='Y') a,
(select rnumber,pid,viewdate as first_viewdate from table where rowid in 
(select min(rowid) from table group by rnumber) and rented !='Y') b
where a.rnumber=b.rnumber;
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you are amazing! This works perfectly, after I noticed that I forgot to add the table name. Thank you so much :) –  issaaccbb Mar 7 '13 at 10:07
    
This only works when the order of rowid match the order the OP wants. I'm sure it does in this case but oracle will change the rowid for an Index organized table or a partitioned table. If the viewdate was mutated it would also break this. So as a general solution there are better ways –  Conrad Frix Mar 7 '13 at 15:57
    
True. But there are no indexes on this table and it wont be changing soon as it was a practice problem for class. Btw, could someone explain how this works? I've been looking at it over and over. I'm used to programming so DB is not my forte. A PM would be fine if needed. Mostly wondering about line 3-4 –  issaaccbb Mar 7 '13 at 17:23
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Since you've defined last as 'Y' all you need is the first record. For getting the first you can use Row_number .

WITH first 
     AS (SELECT Row_number() 
                  over ( 
                    PARTITION BY rnumber
                    ORDER BY viewdate ) rn, 
                rnumber, 
                pid, 
                viewdate, 
                rented 
         FROM   labdatas13.lookedat) 
SELECT * 
FROM   labdatas13.lookedat last 
       inner join first 
               ON first.rnumber= last.rnumber
WHERE  last.rented = 'Y' 
       AND first.rn = 1 

DEMO

If for some reason you couldn't rely on 'Y' in rented then you'd just add a second ROW_NUMBER Ordering the other way and just use the data from the WITH clause

WITH data
     AS (SELECT Row_number() 
                  over ( 
                    PARTITION BY rnumber
                    ORDER BY viewdate ) rn_first,
                Row_number() 
                  over (
                    PARTITION BY rnumber
                    ORDER BY viewdate desc ) rn_last, 
                rnumber, 
                pid, 
                viewdate, 
                rented 
         FROM   labdatas13.lookedat) 
SELECT * 
FROM   data first
       inner join data lastg
               ON first.rnumber= last.rnumber
WHERE  
  first.rn_first = 1
  AND last.rn_last= 1 

DEMO

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