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I have a form that facilitates a long running operation that produces a running log. What's a good way to implement this with MVVM / WPF?

I could just bind a string property to a TextBlock or a TextBox and keep updating it, but that seems like a lot of string generation. Or, I could have a list of strings, keep adding new strings to it and bind to a list box.

Is there a third option or is either of the above preferable to another?

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I think, aside from the MVVM consideration with wanting to leverage INotifyPropertyChange, it's all a matter of style as opposed to hard and fast set of rules. Any way you go, you'll be generating new strings for each update so I wouldn't be terribly concerned about it unless memory becomes a constraint and you have to throw away older strings or maintain some sort of current buffer. You've been considering the approach I usually use.

When I've done this, I've used a TextBox, but I don't have a strong argument on preferring it over the TextBlock. I also usually use an ObservableCollection<string> rather than a list just for the MVVM INotifyPropertyChange goodness, and with each update add it to the collection.

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Yes - this approach or using StringBuilder is a much better approach than concatenation - since strings are immutable concatenating a string onto the end of an ever growing string is not the best idea. Ok chances are you are never going to get near the memory limit, but it's just good to know that you are safe(r) –  Charleh Mar 7 '13 at 14:09
    
@Charleh - how does StringBuilder fit into updating a running log in UI? –  Michael Teper Mar 7 '13 at 21:36
    
Obviously I wouldn't use it for a running log, but I thought I'd mention it in case the OP was thinking about doing a single string with line breaks instead of a collection of strings - that way a single StringBuilder instance can just be kept in memory and ToStringed after any appends are made. It does sound a bit silly though :D (it was more a comment on string concatenation!) –  Charleh Mar 7 '13 at 22:22

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