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I am aware that there are a lot of questions like this one. But I still could not find a solution.

Check the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/paulocoelho/Yy9Ep/2/

All elements occupy nearly 100% of the height of the browser (along with top and bottom margins). Inside I have two elements:

  • a header. the height can vary (not scrollable)
  • a flexible area. the height depends on the size of the parent, takes the remaining space (scrollable)

It work if I set the content area's height manually, but that breaks the point of being flexible.

Here is the CSS, the rest check the fiddle:

.container{
    position:absolute;
    top:50px;
    bottom:10px;
    width:200px;
    background:green;
}

.flexible{
    /*This works but I need the height to be flexible depending on screen size and the natural height of the header */
    /*height:200px;*/
    overflow-y:scroll;
}

EDIT:

I'd rather not have this being controlled by JS.

share|improve this question
    
The concept just isn't native to CSS. It's much easier to handle it via JS. –  DA. Mar 7 '13 at 4:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your best bet for flexible height is CSS Flexbox.

http://caniuse.com/#search=flexbox

Set your main container element:

display: -webkit-box;
display: -moz-box;
display: box;

However, it isn't well supported by all browsers. You know, the common suspects...

Here's a link to the excellent Mozilla article which explains how Flexbox is used.

https://hacks.mozilla.org/2010/04/the-css-3-flexible-box-model/

You'll be particularly interested in the box-orient: vertical and setting the child element that needs to flex at box-flex: 1

Try playing around with flexbox, it shows the CSS too:

http://flexiejs.com/playground/

And here's your jsfiddle edited with the Flexbox: http://jsfiddle.net/Yy9Ep/3/

Additional information about the status of the Flexbox module:

http://css-tricks.com/old-flexbox-and-new-flexbox/

share|improve this answer
    
I wasn't aware of display: box! Good info! –  DA. Mar 7 '13 at 4:23
    
Well, once this becomes more standard it will help lots. The W3C only just drafted this as a candidate recommendation. It is unfortunately not well supported...yet. –  iGanja Mar 7 '13 at 4:28
    
perfect! great answer. Thanks man –  PCoelho Mar 7 '13 at 4:34
    
You are most welcomed. Let's hope the dark ages of the internet will recede to history and someday the web as the dream canvas of developers/designers will come to pass in the near future. –  VKen Mar 7 '13 at 4:43

I think adding

height:70%;

will do the trick, you may have to play around with the exact amout you want to set, but guess it should work.

you can check it here

fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
that is a good attempt, but if you change the height of the fiddle view port (or the page) there is always a space under the flexible div. –  PCoelho Mar 7 '13 at 4:28

The CSS3 standard does not provide a reliable way to fill the height of a parent element. Using height:100% is often offered as a solution, but again, is not consistently supported by the various browsers. It is generally considered passe to do this now days anyway.

If you simply want to anchor a block element to the bottom of the page or container and have the area in the center scroll:

<div style"position:fixed; bottom:0;">
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