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I am trying to implement a Boyer Moore Horsepoole algorithm. This code was written in Turbo C++, Windows. It worked. I have to port this in ubuntu.

typedef struct skip_table
{
    char index;
    int value;
}skip_table;

void create_table(char*,int);
int discrete_char(char*,int);
int bm(char*, char*);
int lookup(char);
int check_EOF(char*,int);

skip_table *t1;
int tab_len;
FILE *fptr;

int main()
{
    time_t first, second;
    double time_spent;
    long int cnt=0;

    char *key_string,*buf,c; // String to be matched and text
    int i,key_len,text_len,def_shift_len,flag_match=0;

    gets(key_string);
    key_len=strlen(key_string);

    fptr=fopen("test_file.txt","r");
    first = clock();
    fseek(fptr,SEEK_SET,0);
    create_table(key_string,key_len);

    while(flag_match!=1)
    {
        fseek(fptr,100*cnt,0);
        fread(buf,100-key_len-1, 1, fptr);
        flag_match = bm(buf, key_string);
        cnt++;

    printf("\n%d",cnt);
     }
    second =clock();
time_spent=(double)(second-first)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC;

if(flag_match==1)
    printf("\n\nMatch Found in %lf seconds",time_spent);
else
    printf("\n\nMatch NOT Found in %lf seconds",time_spent);

    fclose(fptr);
    return 0;
}

int discrete_char(char* key_string,char* temp,int key_len)
{
    int i,j,count=1,flag=0;

for(i=1;i<key_len;i++)
{
    for(j=0; j<count; j++)
    {
        flag=0;
        if(temp[j] == key_string[i])
        {
            flag=1;
            break;
        }
    }
        if(flag!=1)
        {
            temp[count++]=key_string[i];
            flag=0;
        }
}

temp[count]='\0';
return count;
}

void create_table(char* key_string,int key_len)
{
    int i,j,k,max_index;
char *temp;
temp[0] = key_string[0];

tab_len=discrete_char(key_string,temp,key_len);
t1=(skip_table*)malloc((tab_len-1)*sizeof(skip_table));

for(i=0;i<tab_len;i++)
{
    for(j=0;j<key_len;j++)
    {
        if(temp[i]==key_string[j])
            max_index=j;
    }

    t1[i].index=temp[i];
    t1[i].value=key_len-max_index-1;

    printf("\n\n %c %d",t1[i].index,t1[i].value);
}
}

int bm(char* text, char* key_string)
{
int i_t, i_k, j,k, text_len, key_len, shift, count=0, flag_match=0;
int loop_count;

text_len = strlen(text);
key_len = strlen(key_string);
i_t=key_len;
i_k=key_len;

loop_count=0;

while(i_t<=text_len)
{
    if(count != key_len)
    {
        if(text[i_t-1]==key_string[i_k-1])
        {
            count++;
            i_t--;  i_k--;
            loop_count++;
        }
        else
        {
            if(loop_count>key_len)
            {
                i_t=i_t+lookup(text[i_t-1])+1;
                i_k=key_len;
                loop_count=0;
                continue;
            }
            shift = lookup(text[i_t-1]);
            if(shift<=0)
                shift=key_len;
            i_t = i_t+shift;
            i_k = key_len;
            count=0;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        flag_match =  1;
        break;
    }
}
return flag_match;
}

"int lookup(char index)" returns the respective value field of the index if present in "temp" else returns -1.

There's my whole code.

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1  
What does create_table() do? Add the definition.. –  uba Mar 7 '13 at 5:32
    
Are you certain you're not overflowing temp with the call to gets() which does no bounds checking? –  wilsonmichaelpatrick Mar 7 '13 at 5:36
    
Hint: compile with the debug option (usually -g) and link with it too. Then you'll get line numbers where the problem occurs in the valgrind output, which makes it easier to spot the trouble. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 7 '13 at 6:28
1  
Your code crashes in a function that you're not showing us. How do you expect us to debug this for you? –  NPE Mar 7 '13 at 8:11

2 Answers 2

Not that I see exactly what went wrong but here are some defensive programming tips:

int main()
{
  // initialize all variables before use
  time_t first = 0, second = 0;
  double time_spent = 0.0;
  long int cnt=0;

  char *key_string = NULL;
  char *buf = NULL;
  char  c = '\0';  
  char temp[50] = {0};
  int i = 0,key_len=0,text_len=0,def_shift_len=0,flag_match=0;

// use fgets instead of gets, fgets allows you specify max length

  fgets(temp,sizeof(temp),stdin);
  key_len=strlen(temp);
  key_string = (char*) malloc(key_len+1);

// use strncpy or strcpy_s to specify max size
  strncpy(key_string, temp, sizeof(key_string));

  fptr = fopen("test_file.txt","r");

  first = clock();

// here arguments have wrong order, fseek takes origin as last arg:
  fseek(fptr,0,SEEK_SET);

// could be something in create_table, but you have not supplied it
  create_table(key_string,key_len);

When you have so many variables in a function you may consider moving out parts of the function to other functions

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with using fgets(); it's long past time that gets() gets forgotten about. I don't see a reason for using strncpy() here; you just measured the length of the string, allocated enough space for that and the null, so there's no need for a checking string copy. Had you suggested memmove(key_string, temp, key_len+1) (or memcpy()), then yes, definitely. Independently of that, strncpy(key_string, temp, sizeof(key_string)); is wrong; it should be strncpy(key_string, temp, key_len+1);. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 7 '13 at 6:31
    
Good spotting the misordered arguments for fseek(); you'd get more points for noting that it is unnecessary since files are opened for reading at the start. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 7 '13 at 6:34
    
@JonathanLeffler yes i agree abt strncpy, strcpy is fine, I have edited the answer. true also about fseek although what he had before could have caused issues - i am also not sure if he is showing all code. –  CyberSpock Mar 7 '13 at 7:46
    
hey thank you all a lot.. did solve the problem.. Turbo C is i guess a very easy tool that does not check these faults.. will take care in future.. Thank you.. :) –  user2095777 Mar 11 '13 at 10:13

Try using --track-origins=yes on your valgrind options as well, as the output suggests, this can help track down where uninitialised varables have come from.

As others have suggested, the issue valgrind is reporting is inside create_table, so please post the code for that as well.

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