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I'm struggling with a concept here, not really a particular piece of code. I feel like I've been misinformed and I'm trying to get my head around it.

Here's some sample code:

List myList = new ArrayList<String>();

for (int i=1; i<11; i++) {
    Foo myObject = new Foo();
    myList.add(myObject.Bar)
}

I've been told that because myList contains a reference to myObject.Bar that myObject in it's entirety won't be eligible for GC until myList is out of scope. I was told that if I did

List myList = new ArrayList<String>();

for (int i=1; i<11; i++) {
    Foo myObject = new Foo();
    myList.add(new String(myObject.Bar))
}

instead, myObject becomes eligible for GC because it's not being "strongly referenced".

It doesn't seem right though, can somebody explain it to me?

Feel free to correct my terminology, Java is not my first language.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I assume you really meant something like:

Foo myObject = new Foo();
myList.add(myObject.bar);

No, you've been misled. Unless Foo.bar itself contains a reference back to the "owning" Foo (which it won't if it's really just a string), it won't prevent your newly created Foo instance from being garbage collected. If you are personally in contact with the person who misled you, I suggest you ask them for more details. I can see one of three options:

  • They may well have misunderstood the situation.
  • The situation may not be quite as you've described it; for example, you might be talking about something more like:

    String longString = getLongString();
    myList.add(longString.substring(0, 4));
    

    ... at which point whether or not the original "large amount of character data" can be garbage collected depends on the implementation.

  • They may simply misunderstand garbage collection, in which case you'd be doing them a favour by getting them to think about it more closely (and look at this answer and any others posted).
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I've edited the sample code. myObject.Bar is indeed what I meant, I wrote it in haste. It's also definitely not a substring, I read edge cases about why new String(String); would be preferred and that came up. I think they are misunderstanding the object reference, but they've been doing Java for longer than I have, so I wanted to do my research first. Thanks for the help! –  Nathan Mar 7 '13 at 5:57

Assuming that the code is correct and that you intended it that way, In the below Code, during the entire execution, the reference myObject is not set to null and thus the object is not lost. thus it cannot be garbage collected.

List myList = new ArrayList<String>();

for (int i=1; i<11; i++) {
    Foo myObject = new Foo();
    myList.add(new String(Foo.Bar))
}

Only after the For loop has ended, the object goes out of scope and thus becomes garbage collected.

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