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I am tying to implement a depth first search algorithm in java to find the best way to move in a quadratic matrix. I am avoiding to create "unnecessary" objects, i.e object just to hold (X,Y) positions.

Am I forgetting something? I am running it with starting points of (0,0) and with objective of (4,5). What happens is an infinite loop.

int x = this.move_to_x;
int y = this.move_to_y;

Stack X = new Stack();
Stack Y = new Stack();

Stack visited_X = new Stack();
Stack visited_Y = new Stack();

X.push(this.current_x);
Y.push(this.current_y);

while(!X.empty()){
    int tmp_x = (int)X.pop();
    int tmp_y = (int)Y.pop();

    if(tmp_x == x && tmp_y == y){
        System.out.println("best way found!");
        return;
    }

    //there is only 8 possible ways to go (the neighbors)
    for(int a = -1; a < 2; a++){
        for(int b = -1; b < 2; b++){
            if(a == 0 && b == 0){
                break;
            }

            if(visited_X.search(tmp_x + a) == -1 && visited_Y.search(tmp_y + b) == -1){
                X.push(tmp_x + a);
                Y.push(tmp_y + b);

                visited_X.push(tmp_x + a);
                visited_Y.push(tmp_y + b);

                System.out.println("added x " + tmp_x + a + " y " + tmp_y + b);
            }
        }
    }
}
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1  
perfect case for using a debugger ;-) –  Blizzer Mar 7 '13 at 6:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I can see several problems:

1) In the following:

        if(a == 0 && b == 0){
            break;
        }

you should be using continue rather than break.

2) The following:

if(visited_X.search(tmp_x + a) == -1 && visited_Y.search(tmp_y + b) == -1){

is incorrect: the (tmp_x, tmp_y) pair has to be present at the same index in visited_X/visited_Y.

3) You should add the starting position to visited_{X,Y}.

4) Algorithmically, I don't see any reason to think that your method would return the shortest path.

5) The reason your code ends up in (an almost) infinite loop is that you don't check for the matrix boundaries.

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4) You are right. I confused depth first search with breadth first search. –  Frederico Schardong Mar 7 '13 at 6:54

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