Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a vector and I need to sum every n numbers and return the results. This is the way I plan on doing it currently. Any better way to do this?

v = 1:100
n = 10
sidx = seq.int(from=1, to=length(v), by=n)
eidx = c((sidx-1)[2:length(sidx)], length(v))
thesum = sapply(1:length(sidx), function(i) sum(v[sidx[i]:eidx[i]]))

This gives:

thesum
 [1]  55 155 255 355 455 555 655 755 855 955
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted
unname(tapply(v, (seq_along(v)-1) %/% n, sum))
# [1] 55 155 255 355 455 555 655 755 855 955 
share|improve this answer
    
most succinct answer –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 7 '13 at 7:40

You can use tapply

tapply(1:100,cut(1:100,10),FUN=sum)

or to get a list

by(1:100,cut(1:100,10),FUN=sum)

EDIT

In case you have 1:92, you can replace your cut by this :

cut(1:92,seq(1,92,10),include.lowest=T)
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - great answer illustrating cut. thanks! –  Alex Mar 7 '13 at 17:59

One way is to convert your vector to a matric then take the column sums:

colSums(matrix(v, nrow=n))
[1]  55 155 255 355 455 555 655 755 855 955

Just be careful: this implicitly assumes that your input vector can in fact be reshaped to a matrix. If it can't, R will recycle elements of your vector to complete the matrix.

share|improve this answer
    
It is not every nth number, but every n numbers. –  Arun Mar 7 '13 at 7:44
1  
@Arun Thank you. Answer edited. –  Andrie Mar 7 '13 at 7:49

UPDATE:

If you want to sum every n consecutive numbers use colSums
If you want to sum every nth number use rowSums

as per Josh's comment, this will only work if n divides length(v) nicely.

rowSums(matrix(v, nrow=n))
 [1] 460 470 480 490 500 510 520 530 540 550

colSums(matrix(v, nrow=n))
 [1]  55 155 255 355 455 555 655 755 855 955

share|improve this answer
1  
Only works if length(v) is evenly divisible by n. Otherwise vector recycling will bite you. (See e.g. v <- 1:3; n <- 2; matrix(v, nrow=n).) –  Josh O'Brien Mar 7 '13 at 7:51
    
@JoshO'Brien, good call –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 7 '13 at 7:52
    
Will work only if matrix(..., byrow=TRUE), hence @Andrie answer where he uses colSumsand not rowSums. –  plannapus Mar 7 '13 at 7:55
    
@plannapus, it wasnt clear if OP wanted every n-consecutive or every nth number. –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 7 '13 at 7:58
1  
If it is every nth number, I'd say just 550 is the answer. 10th, 20th etc.. Not 1, 11..., 2, 12 ... etc.. –  Arun Mar 7 '13 at 8:06
v <- 1:100

n <- 10

cutpoints <- seq( 1 , length( v ) , by = n )

categories <- findInterval( 1:length( v ) , cutpoints )

tapply( v , categories , sum )
share|improve this answer
    
(+1) this gives the right result as well, even if v = 1:92 and n = 10. –  Arun Mar 7 '13 at 7:51

I will add one more way of doing it without any function from apply family

v <- 1:100
n <- 10

diff(c(0, cumsum(v)[slice.index(v, 1)%%n == 0]))
##  [1]  55 155 255 355 455 555 655 755 855 955
share|improve this answer
2  
Just be aware that when, e.g. v <- 1:99, this will not include the sum of the final 9 numbers (which might or might not be OK). –  Josh O'Brien Mar 7 '13 at 8:07
    
@JoshO'Brien agreed.. I just wanted to put out an option.. –  Chinmay Patil Mar 7 '13 at 8:11
    
nv = length(v); i = c(seq_len(nv %/% n) * n, if (nv %% n) nv else NULL) and then diff(c(0, cumsum(v)[i])) seems to get the edge cases of length(v) == 0 and length(v) %% n != 0. –  Martin Morgan Mar 7 '13 at 13:42

Here are some of the main variants offered so far

f0 <- function(v, n) {
    sidx = seq.int(from=1, to=length(v), by=n)
    eidx = c((sidx-1)[2:length(sidx)], length(v))
    sapply(1:length(sidx), function(i) sum(v[sidx[i]:eidx[i]]))
}

f1 <- function(v, n, na.rm=TRUE) {    # 'tapply'
    unname(tapply(v, (seq_along(v)-1) %/% n, sum, na.rm=na.rm))
}

f2 <- function(v, n, na.rm=TRUE) {    # 'matrix'
    nv <- length(v)
    if (nv %% n)
        v[ceiling(nv / n) * n] <- NA
    colSums(matrix(v, n), na.rm=na.rm)
}

f3 <- function(v, n) {                # 'cumsum'
    nv = length(v)
    i <- c(seq_len(nv %/% n) * n, if (nv %% n) nv else NULL)
    diff(c(0L, cumsum(v)[i]))
}

Basic test cases might be

v = list(1:4, 1:5, c(NA, 2:4), integer())
n = 2

f0 fails with the final test, but this could probably be fixed

> f0(integer(), n)
Error in sidx[i]:eidx[i] : NA/NaN argument

The cumsum approach f3 is subject to rounding error, and the presence of an NA early in v 'poisons' later results

> f3(c(NA, 2:4), n)
[1] NA NA

In terms of performance, the original solution is not bad

> library(rbenchmark)
> cols <- c("test", "elapsed", "relative")
> v <- 1:100; n <- 10
> benchmark(f0(v, n), f1(v, n), f2(v, n), f3(v, n),
+           columns=cols)
      test elapsed relative
1 f0(v, n)   0.012     3.00
2 f1(v, n)   0.065    16.25
3 f2(v, n)   0.004     1.00
4 f3(v, n)   0.004     1.00

but the matrix solution f2 seems to be both fast and flexible (e.g., adjusting the handling of that trailing chunk of fewer than n elements)

> v <- runif(1e6); n <- 10
> benchmark(f0(v, n), f2(v, n), f3(v, n), columns=cols, replications=10)
      test elapsed relative
1 f0(v, n)   5.804   34.141
2 f2(v, n)   0.170    1.000
3 f3(v, n)   0.251    1.476
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - thanks for comparing all these! –  Alex Mar 7 '13 at 18:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.