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Compare the following two pieces of code:

1.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class B{
public:
    int val;
};
int main(){
    B *b;
    int t = 0;
    b->val = 1;
    cout << 123 << endl;
    return 0;
}

2.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class B{
public:
    int val;
};
int main(){
    B *b;
    b->val = 1;
    cout << 123 << endl;
    return 0;
}

Both versions compile. Code #1 runs good but code #2 gets runtime error.

I'm compiling using C++11 and running a windows machine.

That really confuses me. Can anybody tell me the reason?

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closed as too localized by jogojapan, Bo Persson, Christian Rau, daramarak, dreamlax Mar 7 '13 at 10:13

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
you are accessing not initialized pointer - behaviour in both cases is undefined –  Maciek B Mar 7 '13 at 7:41
3  
@MaciekB: That should be an answer, not a comment. –  Dietrich Epp Mar 7 '13 at 7:41
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5 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Both are wrong. The b pointer is uninitialized, so you should not be accessing memory through it.

B *b;
b->val = 1;

So you got lucky when one of them crashed.

The other one you got unlucky, and it didn't crash.

Fixes

You can remove indirection...

B b;
b.val = 1;

Or you can allocate it...

std::unique_ptr<B> b(new B());
b->val = 1;
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2  
+1 for lucky/unlucky! –  Johnsyweb Mar 7 '13 at 8:18
    
+1 for using smart pointers. :) –  Skalli Mar 7 '13 at 8:47
    
Learned a lot. Thanks! –  Charles Gao Mar 7 '13 at 9:13
    
I'd say both cases are unlucky. When undefined behaviour appears to be working, you are unlucky that you are now relying on it. –  dreamlax Mar 7 '13 at 10:14
1  
@dreamlax: Two alternatives cannot both be unlucky, that is a logical contradiction. But read what I wrote again: I called working UB unlucky, not lucky. I said you are lucky precisely when the UB crashes, since then you know something is wrong. –  Dietrich Epp Mar 7 '13 at 20:06
show 3 more comments

You are de-referencing an uninitialized pointer here

b->val = 1;

The location the pointer points to is undetermined: it could point anywhere.

Following this pointer is undefined behaviour (UB), which means anything can happen, which is what you are seeing.

What is really happening is that you are writing a value to a segment of memory that you shouldn't. There is no way of knowing what is located there, and the C++ standard can make no promises about possible outcomes. It just calls this UB. It is up to you to avoid these situations.

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The problem is that you are using an uninitialized pointer: B* b;. In C and C++, built-in types are not initialized upon creation: they just hold junk.

The solution to your problem is simple: do not use a pointer. B b; will create a class instance and call its constructor.

Code #1 runs good but code #2 gets runtime error.

In Standardese parlance, both code exhibit undefined behavior. This means that pretty much anything can happen and that comprises seemingly working (ie, there might be an error but there is no visible symptom).

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You need to initialize any pointer before using it. What you see is so called undefined behavior.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class B{
public:
    int val;
};
int main(){
    B *b = new B();
    int t = 0;
    b->val = 1;
    cout << 123 << endl;
    delete b;
    return 0;
}

should work as well as

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class B{
public:
    int val;
};
int main(){
    B b;
    int t = 0;
    b.val = 1;
    cout << 123 << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
In your first example, you are leaking memory. Be wary when advising beginners, they do not (necessarily) have the knowledge to correct those small defects and may take your advice at face value. –  Matthieu M. Mar 7 '13 at 7:46
    
thanks for the hint. Wrote the answer a bit too qickly... –  Philipp Mar 7 '13 at 7:48
1  
Second hint then: in C++, it is advisable to use smart pointers rather than manual deletion, for example std::unique_ptr<B> b(new B());. –  Matthieu M. Mar 7 '13 at 7:58
add comment

b->val is pointing to an invalid memory location. Allocate memory for b before assigning b->val

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