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I have a question in regarding aggregate roots, should they have the responsibility for deleting child objects or should that be up to the repository? What if I wanna query one file by its Id, should I then create a specific method for this in my repository?

Code snippet of my aggregate root:

public class Folder {

   #region Properties

   public Guid Id { get;set; }
   public Name { get;set; }
   public virtual ICollection<File> Files { get;set; }

   #endregion

   #region Methods

   public File AddFile(string type, string title, bool share = false)
   {
     ///
   }

   #endregion
}

File class:

public class File
{
    #region Properties

    public virtual Folder Folder { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public string Type { get; set; }
    public bool Shared { get; set; }

    #endregion

    #region Constructor

    public File(Folder folder, string type, string title, bool share = false)
    {
        ///
    }

    #endregion
}

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

Aggregate root are responsible for domain invariants (see http://dddcommunity.org/library/vernon_2011/).

So the answer is yes, the aggregate root should be the only object that has access to the objects that it aggregates. This means that no other object should obtain a reference to a File and that File should not expose any method that change its own state.

All method that change the state of the child object should be exposed by the aggregate root itself, since it must ensure the aggregated invariants.

As to persisting the deletion, I usually model domain events as .NET events: such events are then subscribed by the Repository before returning the entity. Thus, in the event handler the persistence logic occurs (see http://epic.tesio.it/doc/manual/observable_entities.html for details)

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Can you share an example where you use events in aggregate root? –  John Mar 8 '13 at 8:43
    
A toy sample is here: github.com/Shamar/Epic.NET/blob/devel/Challenges/… (but it's really a toy sample). Unfortunatly I can't share code from the our domains, since I don't own the copyright. I can just describe them. For example an AdvisoryContract expose domain events such as RequiringUpdateOfAssetAllocationForInvestmentsInDraft, CustomizedAssetAllocationForInvestmentsInDraft and so on, each carrying useful info in their specific EventArgs. This proved to work very well. –  Giacomo Tesio Mar 8 '13 at 8:53

This depends heavily on your context. If a file has its own lifecycle independent of the folder then you could make a File an entity/AR. This would, however, mean you need to break the instance aggregation relationship in the Folder so that it only has the reference to the File. Something like this:

public class Folder
{
    public Guid Id { get;set; }
    public string Name { get;set; }

    public List<ContainedFile> Files { get;set; }
}


public class File
{
    public Guid Id { get;set; }

    public string Title { get;set; }
}

public class ContainedFile // or FolderFIle or whatever makes sense in your domain
{
    public Guid FileId { get;set; }
}

Try to keep references to other AR instances out of an AR. Also, that bi-directional relationship (File.Folder) is not necessary. That is probably an indication that you are using your domain model for navigation :) --- try not to do that.

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AggregateRoots should be responsible for their child objects. In the case of your example, imagine that the Folder exposes a Size property, which is determined from the sum of the size of Files.

long Size{get{return Files.Sum(f => f.Size);}

So when you're actually deleting the file, the folder would need to know about it.

You might not have the Size property now - but part of the purpose of following DDD is so that when you need to implement it it's easy and clean to do.

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