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Define a 2 bits or less change towards a 32-bit integer is considered "valid".
To simplify, let's take the case of a 4-bit binary.
0000 -> 1000 is valid
0000 -> 1100 is valid
0000 -> 1001 is valid
0000 -> 1101 is not valid

So actually this means there are C(32, 2) * 2^2 possible combinations

I wonder how to write a function like vector<int> foo(int numberToBeChanged, int n) that takes a number n (the number of bit changes allowed) and returns the set of all possible combinations? Thanks.

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do you actually need the list of possible changes (from 0x00000000 I suppose) or a function which checks whether a given number is an allowed change (from 0x00000000) ? –  Andre Holzner Mar 7 '13 at 8:43
    
if you just need a function to calculate the Hamming distance of two binary strings and you're on a modern X86 processor, you may want to look at the POPCNT instruction (combined with xor) –  Andre Holzner Mar 7 '13 at 8:47
    
Regarding number of possible combinations, actually it is not C(32, 2) * 4 as you have noted, because you have counted duplicates too. Real number of combinations will be 1 + 32 + C(32, 2), each of the 3 parts denoting respectively combinations with no changes, 1 bit change and 2 bit change. –  aram90 Mar 7 '13 at 10:38
    
@AndreHolzner a list, checking is fairly easy –  NSF Mar 7 '13 at 18:51
    
@aram90 ur right –  NSF Mar 7 '13 at 18:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This will do it:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

vector<unsigned int> foo(unsigned int n)
{
    vector<unsigned int> ans;

    // One of the combinations is not to change anything, i.e. number itself
    ans.push_back(n);

    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < 32; i++) {
        // Combinations with only one bit changed
        ans.push_back(n ^ (1 << i));
        for(unsigned int j = 0; j < i; j++) {
            // Combinations with two bits changed
            ans.push_back(n ^ (1 << i) ^ (1 << j));
        }
    }
    return ans;
}

int main()
{
    vector<unsigned int> v = foo(0);
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < v.size(); i++) {
        cout << v[i] << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

P.S. Here is modified code according to description change:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

/*
    start denotes bit number from which we should start loop, i.e. we can't
    modify any bits before that bit to avoid duplicates (we are modifying bits
    with order from lowest to highest, so if we have modified some bit, next bit
    to modify should be a higher one.
*/
void foo(vector<unsigned int>& ans, unsigned int number, int n, unsigned int start)
{
    // As we reached to current number someway then it is one of the combinations
    ans.push_back(number);
    if(n < 1) {
        // No more changes allowed, go back
        return;
    }

    // Try change one bit
    for(unsigned int i = start; i < 32; i++) {
        foo(ans, number ^ (1 << i), n - 1, i + 1);
    }
}

int main()
{
    vector<unsigned int> v;
    unsigned int startingNumber = 0;
    int changesAllowed = 2;
    foo(v, startingNumber, changesAllowed, 0);
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < v.size(); i++) {
        cout << v[i] << endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
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Hi aram90 thank you for typing your answer. However n actually denotes the number of bit changes allowed. Check my edit just now. I know the argument was misleading. Sorry about that. –  NSF Mar 7 '13 at 18:56
    
I have added new code according to your description changes. –  aram90 Mar 8 '13 at 10:19
    
yeah I figured out how to do that later. I didn't use your number argument and instead added a line to check whether a bit is set or not. If it is then break. Thanks anyway! –  NSF Mar 8 '13 at 17:48

If you want to change just two bits in yours number N, you can use this:

for (size_t i = 0; i < sizeof(int); ++i) {
    int one = N ^ (1<<i);
    for (size_t j = 0; j < i; ++j)
        vec.push(one ^ (1<<j));
    vec.push(one);
}
vec.push(N);

For any another n: generate a list of numbers with n, (n-1), ... 0 bits set and xor your N with all of them. There are a lot of answered questions, how to generate such lists. There are, in fact, O(2^(sizeof(int))) possible numbers for big n. I'd prefer to use generator, not a full list, if I wanted just to iterate them.

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