Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given this hack.c program:

#include <stdio.h>
main()
{
 int i=0;
 for(i=0; i<100; i++) {
   printf("%d\n", i);
   sleep(5);
 }
}

and this hack.sh bash script:

#!/bin/bash
./hack

If I run hack.sh, two processes get created - one for bash, one for the C task. If a TERM signal gets sent to the bash process, the C process is unharmed.

Now, suppose the original bash was launched from a Java program using Runtime.exec(), so the only control I have over it is Process.destroy() (which sends TERM to the bash process)? Suppose I want the C process to die along with the bash that launched it?

I've been trying things like this in bash:

#!/bin/bash
trap "kill -TERM -$$; exit" TERM
./hack

i.e. a trap clause that catches the TERM signal and rebroadcasts it to the whole process group. This doesn't work for me - a bash process with that trap clause in it ignores TERM signals.

What am I missing here?

share|improve this question
1  
The man page of bash says: If bash is waiting for a command to complete and receives a signal for which a trap has been set, the trap will not be executed until the command completes. –  tangens Oct 6 '09 at 17:03
    
Have you tried using exec instead of keeping the shell process alive? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 6 '09 at 18:08
    
You're right, tangens. My only excuse is that text is in the SIGNALS section, way above the trap documentation. Thanks! –  user185094 Oct 6 '09 at 18:24

1 Answer 1

You might try something along these lines:

#!/bin/bash
./hack &
pid=$!
trap "kill $pid" TERM
wait $pid

It might be simpler (and equivalent) to do this:

#!/bin/bash
./hack &
trap "kill $!" TERM
wait

The double-quotes on the trap should make word expansion happen when the trap is defined, so a changing value of $! shouldn't have an impact; but I like the first version better.

share|improve this answer
    
This works, even though you might think it doesn't because of what tangens said in the comments on the question. BUT the complete paragraph, qouted partially by tangens, says: –  hopla Sep 22 '10 at 12:35
    
If bash is waiting for a command to complete and receives a signal for which a trap has been set, the trap will not be executed until the command completes. When bash is waiting for an asynchronous command via the wait builtin, the reception of a signal for which a trap has been set will cause the wait builtin to return immediately with an exit status greater than 128, immediately after which the trap is executed. –  hopla Sep 22 '10 at 12:36
    
Also want to add that you can kill the whole process group (the process itself and it's children) by doing: kill -TERM -$$ –  hopla Sep 22 '10 at 12:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.