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I have two snippets:

  while (indent-- > 0)
  {
    out << "  ";
  }
  while (indent > 0)
  {
    indent -= 1;
    out << "  ";
  }

As far as I can see, there isn't any undefined behaviour going on in the first snippet (see here).

My question is: are these two snippets equivalent?

I am not so sure, because the -= operator has a higher precedence than the compare operator, and should therefore be performed first in the first snippet. The second snippet however, only performs this after comparison.

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precedence is irrelevant in both snippets. The only statement with more than one operator is indent-- > 0 and there is no ambivalence. (indent--) > 0 is the only way to parse it, indent-- (> 0) or indent (-- > 0) are not valid. –  fschmengler Mar 12 '13 at 8:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

They will run the body of the loop the same number of times, but they are not the same.

The first will decrement indent one extra time, leaving indent at -1, because the -- operator will run whether the condition succeeds or fails.

The second will leave indent at 0. Here's a complete working example:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
   int indent = 3;
   while (indent-- > 0)
   {
      std::cout << "First ";  // Prints three times
   }

   std::cout << indent << std::endl;  // Prints -1

   indent = 3;
   while (indent > 0)
   {
      indent -= 1;
      std::cout << "Second ";  // Prints three times
   }

   std::cout << indent << std::endl;  // Prints 0
}

// Output:
// First First First -1
// Second Second Second 0
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1  
There is an additional difference (assuming that indent is a signed integral type): if indent has the value INT_MIN (or the minimum corresponding to the type) before getting to the loop, then the first snippet has undefined behavior. –  Michael Burr Mar 7 '13 at 9:59

There's no difference between the two because indent-- is a post-increment - it will return the previous value of indent - there would be a difference for while (--indent > 0) though.

So, for basic types, they're equivalent.

Since this is C++, though, you can just as well define your own class, have indent an object of that type, overload -- and =(int) and > and have them behave completely different (I hope this isn't the case).

EDIT: correct, the value of indent isn't the same.

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No, this is part of some old code that I am reviewing/documenting :P I just want to make it more obvious what the code is actually doing –  Arnab Datta Mar 7 '13 at 9:41
1  
You are one sec early.. deleted my answer.. But please read Pihhan's answer, there is difference between both codes.. –  Krishnabhadra Mar 7 '13 at 9:42
    
However the value of indent after the loop will be different for the two snippets. –  Michael Burr Mar 7 '13 at 9:50

I think they are different. What is missing is initialization of indent and its type.

First loop will always decrement after comparison, second only when condition was true. If (indent > 0) is true before loop, they behave exactly the same way. If indent==0 however, first loop will make it -1 without printing it once. Second will not print any indent, but wont decrease indent also.

So, they are different in some cases.

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3  
This statement is not correct: "If (indent > 0) is true before loop, they behave exactly the same way." The first snippet will always decrement indent one more time than the second snippet. –  Michael Burr Mar 7 '13 at 9:48
    
You are right, they are not same in any case. –  Pihhan Mar 7 '13 at 9:55

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