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The following test code produces an undesired output, even though I used a width parameter:

int main(int , char* [])
{
    float test = 1234.5f;
    float test2 = 14.5f;

    printf("ABC %5.1f DEF\n", test);
    printf("ABC %5.1f DEF\n", test2);

    return 0;
}

Output

ABC 1234.5 DEF   
ABC  14.5 DEF

How to achieve an output like this, which format string to use?

ABC 1234.5 DEF   
ABC   14.5 DEF
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This looks like c, not c++. Did you intend to tag c++? –  hmjd Mar 7 '13 at 10:00
    
@hmjd: My real code is C++, but this example is pure C. So you are right, I try to retag it. –  nabulke Mar 7 '13 at 10:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The following should line everything up correctly:

printf("ABC %6.1f DEF\n", test);
printf("ABC %6.1f DEF\n", test2);

When I run this, I get:

ABC 1234.5 DEF
ABC   14.5 DEF

The issue is that, in %5.1f, the 5 is the number of characters allocated for the entire number, and 1234.5 takes more than five characters. This results in misalignment with 14.5, which does fit in five characters.

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Ah, the decimal point is counted in the width too, isn't it? –  nabulke Mar 7 '13 at 10:02
2  
@nabulke: Yes, every character counts. –  NPE Mar 7 '13 at 10:03

You're trying to print something wider than 5 characters, so make your length specifier larger:

printf("ABC %6.1f DEF\n", test);
printf("ABC %6.1f DEF\n", test2);

The first value is not "digits before the point", but "total length".

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