Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a custom collection as shown below

public class CustomCollection<T>:IEnumerable<T>, IEnumerator<T>
{
    int size = 0;
    int current = 0;
    int position = -1;
    CustomComparer<T> cmp = new CustomComparer<T>();

    T[] collection = null;
    public CustomCollection(int sizeofColl)
    {
        size = sizeofColl;
        collection = new T[size];
    }

    public void Push(T value)
    {
        if (!collection.Contains(value, cmp))
            collection[current++] = value;
    }

    public T Pop()
    {
        return collection[--current];
    }        

    IEnumerator<T> IEnumerable<T>.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return (IEnumerator<T>)this;
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public T Current
    {
        get { return collection[position]; }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {

    }

    object System.Collections.IEnumerator.Current
    {
        get { throw new NotImplementedException(); }
    }

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        position++;
        if (position >= collection.Length)
            return false;
        else
            return true;
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Now I want to have a collection of Person class which is as below along with the IEqualityComparer

 public class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int ID { get; set; }       
}

public class CustomComparer<T>:IEqualityComparer<T>    {


    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        Person p1 = x as Person;
        Person p2 = y as Person;
        if (p1 == null || p2 == null)
            return false;
        else
            return p1.Name.Equals(p2.Name);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        Person p = obj as Person;
        return p.Name.GetHashCode();
    }
}

Now when I perform the following operation on the collection, why only Equals Method is called and not the GetHashCode() ?

  CustomCollection.CustomCollection<Person> custColl = new CustomCollection<Person>(3);
        custColl.Push(new Person() { Name = "per1", ID = 1 });
        custColl.Push(new Person() { Name = "per2", ID = 2 });
        custColl.Push(new Person() { Name = "per1", ID = 1 });

Or how can I make my code to call GetHashCode ?

share|improve this question
    
Recommended reading: stackoverflow.com/questions/371328/… –  Richard Mar 7 '13 at 10:06
    
Additionally, in your logic for your Equals(...), what happens if both names are null? Should these be considered equal? Or should the exception be thrown. –  Richard Mar 7 '13 at 10:08
    
@Richard I think it would be better to throw an exception –  Vikram Mar 7 '13 at 10:11
1  
@Vikram meh; personally I'd just use return p1.Name == p2.Name - job done and no issues with null. Also; you might want to consider what happens if both x and y are null. Most people would expect that to return true; –  Marc Gravell Mar 7 '13 at 10:13
2  
Btw, .NET has a Stack<T> class already. And why do you actually want GetHashCode to be called? –  Groo Mar 7 '13 at 10:14

1 Answer 1

This relates to the line:

if (!collection.Contains(value, cmp))

A test against a vector or sequence (since that looks like Enumerable.Contains) would have no purpose in calling GetHashCode(); that is useful if the data has been grouped into hash-buckets or some other optimized structure, but the data here is just a flat sequence of values. If it needs to call a method, it might as well call Equals rather than GetHashCode(), because if the hash was the same it would still need to call Equals (a hash-code indicates non-equality, but cannot indicate equality). So it is a choice of calling exactly one method per object, vs at least one method per object, and possibly two methods per object. The first is obviously preferable.

If the data were a Dictionary<Person, ...> or a HashSet<Person>, then I would expect GetHashCode() to be used.

share|improve this answer
    
In some cases, it may make fast for collections that aren't hash tables to cache the hash values of their contents, and use a hash comparison as a prelude to a more detailed comparison. Searching an array of integers for a value is O(1), just like searching through a list of values for one that returns true for Equals, but could be many times faster. –  supercat Mar 7 '13 at 17:28
    
@supercat that basically depends on having an implementation to do that. A vector/array does not - the data here is in a vector. So searching an array of integers for a value is always going to be O(n). I agree there are scenarios where hashing is used, but since the code clearly shows we are using a vector directly: this is not one of them. –  Marc Gravell Mar 8 '13 at 7:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.