Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to have a python hierarchical data structure with a map and the value will be a tuple. In some cases the tuple will be of length 1. Python intelligently flattens the structure whenever the tuple is of length 1. Observe the example below which can be run in a python interpreter. In the "another_scenario" I expected the length to be 1 but it has drilled one level below and got the underlying steps. This totally screws up my tests because I rely on that being a tuple with the command, function_list, function list.

Question - Why does this happen? How do I ask python to not flatten it?

import os

def run():
    my_scenario = {
            "scenario_name" : 
            (   # Each scenario is a List of (command, function_list, function_list)
                # function_list = one function OR tuple of functions
                (
                    "command1",
                    (
                        os.path,
                        os.path.exists
                    ),
                    None
                ),
                (
                    "command2",
                    (
                        os.path,
                        os.path.exists
                    ),
                    None
                )
            )
        } 
    another_scenario = {
            "scenario_name" : 
            (
                (
                    "command1",
                    (
                        os.path,
                        os.path.exists
                    ),
                    None
                )
            )
    }
    for name in my_scenario:
        print "Full Scenario is %s" % str(my_scenario[name])
        print "Length should be 2 -> %s" % len(my_scenario[name])
    for name in another_scenario:
        print "Full Scenario is %s" % str(another_scenario[name])
        print "Length should be 1 -> %s" % len(another_scenario[name]) #Prints 3 as it drills one level down


if __name__ == "__main__":
    run()    
share|improve this question
    
If I replace the () with [] i.e, use List insted of tuples in the above I get the output I expect. I do not want to use Lists though –  Calm Storm Mar 7 '13 at 10:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to add a comma:

another_scenario = {
        "scenario_name": 
        (
            (
                "command1",
                (
                    os.path,
                    os.path.exists
                ),
                None
            ),  # <- Note this comma
        )
}

to make that a tuple, otherwise it is just an expression. 1-element tuples can only be distinguished from expressions by the presence of a comma:

>>> (1)
1
>>> (1,)
(1,)
>>> type((1))
<type 'int'>
>>> type((1,))
<type 'tuple'>

In fact, it's the comma that defines tuples, not the parenthesis:

>>> 1,
(1,)
>>> 1, 2
(1, 2)

The parenthesis are only needed when you need to define an empty tuple:

>>> ()
()
share|improve this answer
    
Aah I should have caught that. Unfortunately this makes it DSL-unfriendly (while I agree with the reasons behind this). I cannot expect my scenario-expert to remember to add a trailing ",". I will switch to using [] list syntax now which looks a bit better –  Calm Storm Mar 7 '13 at 10:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.