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I get different answers while searching for a certain element in an array if I am searching forward or backwards using a for loop.

Example: Code that gives CORRECT ANSWER

vg   = rep(seq(0.9,1.1,0.01),90)
vals = seq(0.9,1.05,0.01)

for(val in vals){
  idx = c()
  idx = which((vg) %in% (val))
  cat(val,":",length(idx),"\t")
}

This Code gives: 0.9 : 90 0.91 : 90 0.92 : 90 0.93 : 90 0.94 : 90 0.95 : 90 0.96 : 90 0.97 : 90 0.98 : 90 0.99 : 90 1 : 90 1.01 : 90 1.02 : 90 1.03 : 90 1.04 : 90 1.05 : 90

WHICH IS CORRECT. But if I change the seq of the vg variable above using the CODE below:

vg   = rep(seq(1.1,0.9,-0.01),90)
vals = seq(0.9,1.05,0.01)

for(val in vals){
  idx = c()
  idx = which((vg) %in% (val))
  cat(val,":",length(idx),"\t")
}

I get the answer shown below, WHICH SHOWS 0 NUMBER OF ELEMENTS WHILE SEARCHING FOR 0.96, 0.97 etc.

0.9 : 0 0.91 : 0 0.92 : 0 0.93 : 90 0.94 : 90 0.95 : 90 0.96 : 0 0.97 : 0 0.98 : 0 0.99 : 0 1 : 90 1.01 : 90 1.02 : 90 1.03 : 90 1.04 : 90 1.05 : 90

Why is this discrepancy since we are searching for the exactly same elements in both the codes? Is this a R Bug?

share|improve this question
5  
This is most likely a floating point problem, and almost certainly not an R bug. See the FAQ 7.31 : cran.r-project.org/doc/FAQ/… –  Andrie Mar 7 '13 at 10:18
    
This is not a floating point problem since we are generating all the values in the program itself. When I compare using which(as.character(vg) %in% as.character(val)) it works perfectly. This shows that this is not a floating point problem. Using as.character is just a work-around. –  Amit Mar 7 '13 at 10:31
1  
You're entierly missing the point. Of course it works for character string comparisons. When it comes to numbers, WYSINWYG. –  Carl Witthoft Mar 7 '13 at 12:30
    
And by the way, there's a big difference between "expected answer" and "correct answer." Try not to confuse the two. –  Carl Witthoft Mar 7 '13 at 12:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To expand on Andrie's comment, this is a floating point problem. To quote from the good book, The R Inferno

Once we had crossed the Acheron, we arrived in the rst Circle, home of the virtuous pagans. These are people who live in ignorance of the Floating Point Gods. These pagans expect:

.1 == .3 / 3
[1] FALSE  

to be true. The virtuous pagans will also expect:

seq(0, 1, by=.1) == .3
[1] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE

to have exactly one value that is true.

In your example if we instead work with integers rather than floating point numbers it works:

vg   = rep(seq(90,110,1),90)
vals = seq(90,105,1)

for(val in vals){
  idx = c()
  idx = which((vg) %in% (val))
  cat(val,":",length(idx),"\t")
}

vg   = rep(seq(110,90,-1),90)
vals = seq(90,105,1)

for(val in vals){
  idx = c()
  idx = which((vg) %in% (val))
  cat(val,":",length(idx),"\t")
}
90 : 90         91 : 90         92 : 90         93 : 90         94 : 90         95 : 90         96 : 90  

The R inferno is a really entertaining and informative reading. I highly recommend it.

You can also see that WYSINWYG by default by doing:

options(digits=22)
.3/3
[1] 0.09999999999999999167333
share|improve this answer
    
I understand the point. But why does it show errors only for certain numbers and not for others? I don't get that part. –  Amit Mar 7 '13 at 13:24
    
Because some of the fractional numbers are able to be represented exactly in floating point, whilst others are not. 0.1 is a good example of a number which is not able to be represented exactly in floating point, whilst 0.5 is. Try library(gmp);as.bigq(0.1);as.bigq(0.5) to see the fractional representations of these floating point numbers in memory. –  Simon O'Hanlon Mar 7 '13 at 13:31
    
I really appreciate the comments and feedback. I think I get the point. Thank you Simon, Carl and Andrie. –  Amit Mar 7 '13 at 13:42

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