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I have a data frame containing 7 different dilutions that I want to assign into 3 different bins in all possible combinations for later use in lpSolve. I can generate all 2187 possible combinations using:

expand.grid(1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3)

However, since the actual bin number is not important (but position is), the following entries are all considered identical in this context:

c(1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 3, 3)
c(2, 2, 3, 3, 3, 1, 1)
c(3, 3, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2)
c(3, 3, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1)
c(1, 1, 3, 3, 3, 2, 2)
...

How do I generate only unique "patterns", either by filtering expand.grid output or by using another (custom) function. For example, the lengths output from rle of all of the above vectors would be 2 3 2, but that would also be the case for c(1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 1, 1) which should be not considered identical to the above.

Any fast way around this? I do not need to go higher than 5 bins and 8 dilutions.

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(+1) very interesting problem, although Rcoster beat me to it! :P –  Arun Mar 7 '13 at 12:08
    
I don't think problem is solved yet. –  Chinmay Patil Mar 7 '13 at 13:30
    
@Arun, interesting problem indeed. +1. –  Chinmay Patil Mar 7 '13 at 16:52
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is an answer:

mat <- expand.grid(1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3)

mat <- t(apply(mat, 1, 
               function(x){
                 un <- unique(x)
                 map <- setNames(1:length(un), un)
                 map[as.character(x)]
               }))

mat <- mat[!duplicated(mat), ]
nrow(mat)
# [1] 365

And logic is the following: let us take c(3,3,1,2,1,2,3) and now I convert it to c(1,1,2,3,2,3,1), because 3 is the first unique number from the beginning, 1 is the second and 2 is the third one. In this way I convert all the rows to the same format and it allows me to use duplicated. setNames was useful here, it creates a map from one set of integers to another:

setNames(1:3,3:1)
3 2 1 
1 2 3 
setNames(1:3,3:1)[c("2","1")]
2 1 
2 3 

Finally, the proof:

enter image description here

Which takes into consideration cases when one, two or three different numbers are used. In particular: [(a single number takes all 7 positions)] + [(choosing 1 position for one number and all the rest is for another) + (choosing 2 positions for one number and all the rest is for another) + (choosing 3 positions and all the rest is for another)] + [(choosing 1 position for the first number, 1 position for the second and all the rest is for the third number. Now 1st and 2nd are considered the same, and they both occur once, so we have to divide this term by two) + ...(same logic as before)...]

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I'm not quite sure what this does. But the output should be of dimensions 486 * 7. On a input matrix shown from the post (2187*7), your code gives exact same output (2187*7). –  Arun Mar 7 '13 at 12:07
    
@Arun, yes, output had the same dimensions, but the matrix itself was different and after using duplicated it reduced to 493 rows or so. –  Julius Mar 7 '13 at 19:27
    
@Julius Thanks for looking into this and describing the logic behind the solution. –  Kristoffer W. Balling Mar 7 '13 at 19:56
    
@KristofferW.Balling, no problem. I have updated my answer with the idea of calculating combinations. –  Julius Mar 9 '13 at 11:26
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It's combinatorics question IMO.

I think for 7 elements, you want to choose 2 first and choose 2 from remaining 5 which gives total 210 combinations.

Thanks to Arun, who pointed out that combination 11 22 333 is same as 22 11 333, we can deduce that since first 2 elements are the ones that can interchange, our required number of combinations should be half of 210 that is 105

library(gtools)

# Let's create all possible permutations of 7 elements which will be equal to 7!
p <- permutations(7, 7, 1:7)

head(p)
##      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7]
## [1,]    1    2    3    4    5    6    7
## [2,]    1    2    3    4    5    7    6
## [3,]    1    2    3    4    6    5    7
## [4,]    1    2    3    4    6    7    5
## [5,]    1    2    3    4    7    5    6
## [6,]    1    2    3    4    7    6    5


# bin, sort and combine according to our binning vector c(1,1,2,2,3,3,3)
rp <- t(apply(p, 1, FUN = function(x) as.numeric(sapply(split(x, c(1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 3)), FUN = function(x) paste0(x[order(x)], collapse = "")))))

head(rp)
##      [,1] [,2] [,3]
## [1,]   12   34  567
## [2,]   12   34  567
## [3,]   12   34  567
## [4,]   12   34  567
## [5,]   12   34  567
## [6,]   12   34  567


# sort individual combinations before removing duplicates
srp <- t(apply(rp, 1, function(x) x[order(x)]))

head(srp)
##      [,1] [,2] [,3]
## [1,]   12   34  567
## [2,]   12   34  567
## [3,]   12   34  567
## [4,]   12   34  567
## [5,]   12   34  567
## [6,]   12   34  567


# remove duplicates
srp[!duplicated(srp), ]
##        [,1] [,2] [,3]
##   [1,]   12   34  567
##   [2,]   12   35  467
##   [3,]   12   36  457
##   [4,]   12   37  456
##   [5,]   12   45  367
##   [6,]   12   46  357
##   [7,]   12   47  356
##   [8,]   12   56  347
##   [9,]   12   57  346
##  [10,]   12   67  345
##  [11,]   13   24  567
##  [12,]   13   25  467
##  [13,]   13   26  457
##  [14,]   13   27  456
##  [15,]   13   45  267
##  [16,]   13   46  257
##  [17,]   13   47  256
##  [18,]   13   56  247
##  [19,]   13   57  246
##  [20,]   13   67  245
##  [21,]   14   23  567
##  [22,]   14   25  367
##  [23,]   14   26  357
##  [24,]   14   27  356
##  [25,]   14   35  267
##  [26,]   14   36  257
##  [27,]   14   37  256
##  [28,]   14   56  237
##  [29,]   14   57  236
##  [30,]   14   67  235
##  [31,]   15   23  467
##  [32,]   15   24  367
##  [33,]   15   26  347
##  [34,]   15   27  346
##  [35,]   15   34  267
##  [36,]   15   36  247
##  [37,]   15   37  246
##  [38,]   15   46  237
##  [39,]   15   47  236
##  [40,]   15   67  234
##  [41,]   16   23  457
##  [42,]   16   24  357
##  [43,]   16   25  347
##  [44,]   16   27  345
##  [45,]   16   34  257
##  [46,]   16   35  247
##  [47,]   16   37  245
##  [48,]   16   45  237
##  [49,]   16   47  235
##  [50,]   16   57  234
##  [51,]   17   23  456
##  [52,]   17   24  356
##  [53,]   17   25  346
##  [54,]   17   26  345
##  [55,]   17   34  256
##  [56,]   17   35  246
##  [57,]   17   36  245
##  [58,]   17   45  236
##  [59,]   17   46  235
##  [60,]   17   56  234
##  [61,]   23   45  167
##  [62,]   23   46  157
##  [63,]   23   47  156
##  [64,]   23   56  147
##  [65,]   23   57  146
##  [66,]   23   67  145
##  [67,]   24   35  167
##  [68,]   24   36  157
##  [69,]   24   37  156
##  [70,]   24   56  137
##  [71,]   24   57  136
##  [72,]   24   67  135
##  [73,]   25   34  167
##  [74,]   25   36  147
##  [75,]   25   37  146
##  [76,]   25   46  137
##  [77,]   25   47  136
##  [78,]   25   67  134
##  [79,]   26   34  157
##  [80,]   26   35  147
##  [81,]   26   37  145
##  [82,]   26   45  137
##  [83,]   26   47  135
##  [84,]   26   57  134
##  [85,]   27   34  156
##  [86,]   27   35  146
##  [87,]   27   36  145
##  [88,]   27   45  136
##  [89,]   27   46  135
##  [90,]   27   56  134
##  [91,]   34   56  127
##  [92,]   34   57  126
##  [93,]   34   67  125
##  [94,]   35   46  127
##  [95,]   35   47  126
##  [96,]   35   67  124
##  [97,]   36   45  127
##  [98,]   36   47  125
##  [99,]   36   57  124
## [100,]   37   45  126
## [101,]   37   46  125
## [102,]   37   56  124
## [103,]   45   67  123
## [104,]   46   57  123
## [105,]   47   56  123
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This?

data <- expand.grid(1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3)
len <- apply(data,1,function(x) c(rle(x)$lengths[1:7], nchar(paste(unique(sort(rle(x)$value)), collapse=''))))
data <- data[!(duplicated(t(len))), ]

Or, as @Arun pointed:

data <- expand.grid(1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3, 1:3)
len <- apply(data,1,function(x) c(rle(x)$lengths[1:7], length(unique(x))))
data <- data[!(duplicated(t(len))), ]
share|improve this answer
    
But this would give same lengths for: 2,2,3,3,3,2,2 and 2,2,3,3,3,1,1. Where as it is not desirable to remove the first one. –  Arun Mar 7 '13 at 11:33
    
I think now it's 100%. –  Rcoster Mar 7 '13 at 11:37
    
Agree with @Arun. –  Kristoffer W. Balling Mar 7 '13 at 11:44
    
@KristofferW.Balling: Even after the edit? –  Rcoster Mar 7 '13 at 11:46
    
why nchar(paste(unique(sort(.))))? Isn't this just length(unique(.))? –  Arun Mar 7 '13 at 11:47
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