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Is it possible to check if the string that is being added to file is not already in the file and only then add it? Right now I am using

        $myFile = "myFile.txt";
    $fh = fopen($myFile, 'a') or die("can't open file");
    $stringData = $var . "\n";
    fwrite($fh, $stringData);
    fclose($fh);

But I get many duplicates of $var values and wanted to get rid of them. Thank you

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Can you more clarify the $var –  Ranjit Mar 7 '13 at 11:09
    
More information would make this question easier to answer. Is the file always newline delimited? Are the string fixed-length? Is the file small (feasible for file_get_contents) or gargantuan? –  Dan Lugg Mar 7 '13 at 11:23
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closed as too localized by tereško, Mihai Iorga, Rikesh, Dan Lugg, hakre Mar 7 '13 at 11:47

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

7 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

use this

$file = file_get_contents("myFile.txt");
if(strpos($file, $var) === false) {
   echo "String not found!";
   $myFile = "myFile.txt";
   $fh = fopen($myFile, 'a') or die("can't open file");
   $stringData = $var . "\n";
   fwrite($fh, $stringData);
   fclose($fh);
}
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1  
+1 almost same time :) –  Rikesh Mar 7 '13 at 11:10
1  
what if the string found at position 0 –  user1646111 Mar 7 '13 at 11:10
    
@Akam, it can be solved with strpos() === FALSE –  fedorqui Mar 7 '13 at 11:16
    
upvoting should only be for correct answer without any minor error :) –  user1646111 Mar 7 '13 at 11:17
1  
Just what I needed! Thank you very much! –  user2130729 Mar 7 '13 at 11:28
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Best way is use file_get_contents & perform operation only if $var is not in your file.

$myFile = "myFile.txt";
$file = file_get_contents($myFile);
if(strpos($file, $var) === FALSE) 
{
   $fh = fopen($myFile, 'a') or die("can't open file");
   $stringData = $var . "\n";
   fwrite($fh, $stringData);
   fclose($fh);
}
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1  
if(!strpos("some text", "some")){ echo "not found"; } check this! –  user1646111 Mar 7 '13 at 11:14
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function find_value($input) {

  $handle = @fopen("list.txt", "r");
   if ($handle) {
    while (!feof($handle)) {
     $entry_array = explode(":",fgets($handle));
     if ($entry_array[0] == $input) {
      return $entry_array[1];
     }
  }
 fclose($handle);
}
return NULL;
}

You can do the it like this also

$content = file_get_contents("titel.txt");
$newvalue = "word-searching";
//Then use strpos to find the text exist or not
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$myFile = "myFile.txt";
$filecontent = file_get_contents($myFile);
if(strpos($filecontent, $var) === false){
$fh = fopen($myFile, 'a') or die("can't open file");
$stringData = $var . "\n";
fwrite($fh, $stringData);
fclose($fh);
}else{
 //string found
}
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Possible solution could be :

1. Fetch the contents using fread or file_get_contents
2. Compare the contents with the current contents in file
3. add it if it is not there.
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you could save all your added string in an array and the check with in_array if the current string has been added or not.

Second choice is to read the file each time you want to write and do a strstr on it.

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I believe fgets is the answer here.

$handle = fopen($path, 'r+');      // open the file for r/w
while (!feof($handle)) {            // while not end
    $value = trim(fgets($handle)); // get the trimmed line
    if ($value == $input) {        // is it the value?
        return;                    // if so, bail out
    }                              //
}                                  // otherwise continue
fwrite($handle, $input);           // hasn't bailed, good to write
fclose($handle);                   // close the file

This answer is based solely on the fact that you have appended a newline ("\n") in your code, which is why fgets will work here. This may be preferable over pulling the whole file into memory with file_get_contents(), simply because the size of the file may be prohibitive of that.

Alternatively, if the values are not newline delimited, but are fixed length, you can always use the $length argument of fgets() to pull exactly $n characters out (or use fread() to pull exactly $n bytes out)

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