Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having some trouble making statements involving chained ternary conditional operators.

Obviously I can write them the standard way, but it would be useful to know why they aren't working properly.

Pseudo code for what I want to do:

if $feature ends with 's', make $group = upper case $feature

if $feature ends with 'y', remove the y & replace with 'ies' before making $group = upper case $feature

if $feature ends with anything else, add an 's' and make $group = upper case $feature.

I have tried using c-style ifs:

substr($feature,-1) eq 'y' ? $group = uc(chop($feature)).'IES'
                           : substr($feature,-1) ne 's' ? $group = uc($feature).'S'
                                                        : $group = uc($feature);

and

substr($feature,-1) ne 's' ? substr($feature,-1) eq 'y' ? $group = uc(chop($feature)).'IES'
                                                        : $group = uc($feature).'S'
                           : $group = uc($feature);

What happens is that if I have a string in $feature that ends with say e or n, it doesn't find $group = uc($feature).'S'. I tried changing it around and using eq 's' but then it adds an extra S onto strings that already end with s.

Any help appreciated!

EDIT:

Here is what works thanks to dan1111:

$group = substr($feature,-1) ne 's' ? substr($feature,-1) eq 'y' ? uc(chop($feature)).'IES'
                                    : uc($feature).'S'
         : uc($feature);
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A quirk of Perl is that you can actually assign to the ternary operator:

condition ? $a : $b = 2;

This assigns 2 to either $a or $b depending on whether condition is true.

Similarly, in your code uc($feature) is being assigned to a different part of the conditional depending on what is true.

As a result, if substr($feature,-1) ne 's' is true in your code, Perl does something like this:

($group = uc($feature).'S') = uc($feature);

Which assigns uc($feature) to $group.

I think this feature of Perl is silly and somewhat regrettable. Nonetheless, you really shouldn't be using the ternary operator for control flow. Only use it for simple checks:

print $result == 1 ? 'yes' : 'no';

You certainly shouldn't combine multiple ternary operators together, because it is very confusing. What is wrong with this?

if (substr($feature,-1) eq 'y')
{
    $group = uc(chop($feature)).'IES';
}
elsif (substr($feature,-1) ne 's')
{
    $group = uc($feature).'S';
}
else
{
    $group = uc($feature);
}
share|improve this answer
    
ahhhhhhhhh bingo. That makes sense, cheers! –  bladepanthera Mar 7 '13 at 11:50
    
there is nothing wrong with the full ifs, I just wanted to know why the conditional ones didn't work when they should in theory. :) –  bladepanthera Mar 7 '13 at 11:58
1  
@bladepanthera, fair enough. Of course, if someone held a gun to your head and forced you to use the ternary operators, you could get them to work with parentheses. –  dan1111 Mar 7 '13 at 11:59
1  
true, but why make life simple? and now I (well, you) have cured an itch. –  bladepanthera Mar 7 '13 at 12:00

Here is a solution to your immediate problem:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use feature 'say';

say make_group($_) for qw( curly status color );

=for specification

if $feature ends with 's', make $group = upper case $feature

if $feature ends with 'y', remove the y & replace with 'ies' before making $group = upper case $feature

if $feature ends with anything else, add an 's' and make $group = upper case $feature.

=cut

sub make_group {
    my ($feature) = @_;
    my $last = substr($feature, -1);

    my $group = $last eq 's' ? uc($feature)
              : $last eq 'y' ? do { chop($feature); uc("${feature}ies") }
              : uc("${feature}s")
    ;

    return $group;
}

__END__

However, I would use Lingua::EN::Inflect:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use feature 'say';
use Lingua::EN::Inflect 'PL_N';

say uc(PL_N $_) for qw( curly status color );

__END__
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for interesting alternative. Never heard of 'Lingua::EN::Inflect'. Research time! The only thing I would say about it is that it is not immediately obvious what it does. PL_N is fairly ambiguous uncommented. –  bladepanthera Mar 7 '13 at 13:09
1  
Well, not knowing about and using Lingua::EN::Inflect is your loss, especially given the number of exceptions it takes care of (say, leaf). PL_N stands for plural noun. Nothing is preventing you from using a more verbose alias. –  Sinan Ünür Mar 8 '13 at 16:09
    
Well, I know about it now! A quick check of the CPAN library solved that problem. Only reason I'm not using is because I have less than 10 words to check, so not much point really. Always happy to learn new ways to solve a problem, though, as it may well help me in the future. –  bladepanthera Mar 8 '13 at 16:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.