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  • What scripting languages comes under client side and what and all comes under server side?

  • If JavaScript is scripting language, then what about jquery. jquery is nothing but javascript library rite? so jquery is client side scripting?

    I goggled it, but its still confusing. In some sites its given, client side scripting are JavaScript and vb script and in some other sites its saying only JavaScript. In case of server side, they are mentioning html also.

    Can i have a clear idea about this.

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you can use javascript both client-side and server-side (with Node.js for example) so now the barrier is not that clear –  TheBronx Mar 7 '13 at 12:07

6 Answers 6

Client Side:

Scripts that execute in client side. In context of websites, it is scripts that execute in the browser of the user.

Eg: Javascript, VB etc.

(JQuery, DOJO are libraries build on top of Javascript so it is also client side.)

Server Side:

Scripts that execute in the Server. In context of website, it is scripts that execute on application servers.

Eg: PHP, Python, Ruby etc

We cannot classify languages as client side or server side. There could be a scenario where a server can execute Javascript and render HTML from it. In this context Javascript becomes a server side lanuage. I hope I did not confuse you.

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its clear.. Thanks –  Rachel Mar 7 '13 at 12:16
    
wrong, you can definitely classify languages as client-side or server side, thats primarily what they're used for anyways lol... –  dave Feb 16 at 3:23

Here I will talk only about web programming.

Client side programming has mostly to do with the user interface, with which the user interacts. In web developing it's the browser, in the user's machine, that runs this code, and is mainly done in javascript, flash, etc. This code must run in a variety of browsers.

Its main tasks are:

validating input animation manipulating UI elements applying styles some calculations are done when you don't want the page to refresh so often The person in charge of front end programming must know:

javascript css HTML basic graphic design Ajax maybe Flash some 3rd party javascript libraries like JQuery UI design information design, etc.

Server side programming has to do with generating dynamic content. It runs on servers. Many of these servers are "headless". Most web pages are not static, they search a database in order to show the user updated personalized information. This sides interacts with the back end, like say, the database.

This programming can be done in a lot of languages:

PHP Java and jsp asp Perl Python Ruby on Rails, etc. This code has to do which:

Querying the database Encode the data into html Insert and update information onto the database Business rules and calculations The person in charge of server side programing must know:

some of the languages mentioned above HTML SQL, linux/unix shell scripting OOP business rules, etc.

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What scripting languages comes under client side

For all practical purposes: JavaScript

and what and all comes under server side?

Every programming language under the sun (including JavaScript)

If JavaScript is scripting language, then what about jquery. jquery is nothing but javascript library rite? so jquery is client side scripting?

It is a library. Yes. Generally … it is geared very heavily towards the browser, but (in theory at least) you could use it with something like PhantomJS for manipulating webpages on the server.

I goggled it, but its still confusing. In some sites its given, client side scripting are JavaScript and vb script and in some other sites its saying only JavaScript. In case of server side, they are mentioning html also.

Internet Explorer (although prossibly only older versions) also supports VBScript for client side programming. Using it isn't practical on the WWW since it doesn't run anywhere else.

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thanks Quentin.. its clear.. –  Rachel Mar 7 '13 at 12:16

If the code is compiled/run on the clients machine, it is considered client-side. Serverside means a script which is compiled/run on the server before sending it to a browser. jQuery is just a library for JavaScript. That's all clientside.

For instance, some common used languages on the web.

Client-side: JavaScript
Server-side: PHP, Ruby, Perl

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1  
Ruby On Rails is an MVC framework, not a language. –  Quentin Mar 7 '13 at 12:10
    
Thanks for correcting thay –  JanTheHuman Mar 7 '13 at 12:29
    
Scripts are never "compiled/run", they are just run. Or you might say that they are "interpreted". That's what makes them scripts. –  anthropomorphic Jul 16 '13 at 18:35

In Client side scripting,Script file usually download on client system and client browser compiled this script file and generate HTML. And Generated HTML display by browser.

EX- JavaScript file, Jquery file, AngularJs file.

In server side scripting, when user request page for display then script run on server and generate dynamic HTMl file and send this HTML file to user.

EX- Asp(.asp), Asp.Net(.aspx), PHP(*.php).

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Please go through the below link

for client side programming and server side programming

http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/171203/what-are-the-difference-between-server-side-and-client-side-programming

As for client side scripting and server side scripting. I think if you go through all the answers for this question you will get a clear idea.

jQuery is a framework that uses JavaScript internally.

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two problems here: 1. jQuery is not a framework. 2. jQuery does not use javascript internally, it is built on javascript, and it is still javascript as you code in javascript and jquery together, mixed up or w/e. jquery is effectively a library primarily used to easily manipulate the dom. –  dave Feb 16 at 3:25

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