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I realise this has been asked on here lots of times, but I can't seem to get any of the solutions work so I'm asking the question myself.

I'm trying to create a Progress bar that updates itself in a background thread and increments a bound property to the UI using MVVM. I realise that background threads can't be used to update the UI as we need to use Dispatcher to pass the thread back to the main thread.

I have got it working using the Name property of the Progress bar, but I wanted to use the bound property to effect the progress bar.

Here is some code to underline my point:

MainWindow.xaml

 <StatusBar Grid.ColumnSpan="2" Grid.Row="3" Height="18">
        <StatusBarItem HorizontalAlignment="Left">
            <TextBlock Grid.Column="0" HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Top" Text="Loading:" FontFamily="Tahoma" FontSize="10"/>
        </StatusBarItem>
        <StatusBarItem HorizontalContentAlignment="Stretch">
            <ProgressBar Height="8"  
                         Name="PbLoading" 
                         VerticalAlignment="Top" 
                         Minimum="0" 
                         Maximum="108" 
                         Margin="0 0 5 0" 
                         Value="{Binding Progress}"/>
        </StatusBarItem>
    </StatusBar>

Has the value bound to Progress which is a property of MainWindowViewModel.cs In the code behind I have tried 3 different ways to get this to work and 1 way that works. I will show the way that works first:

MainWindow.cs

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public MainWindowViewModel ViewModel { get; set; }

    public MainWindow()
    {
        ViewModel = new MainWindowViewModel { Progress = 0 };
        InitializeComponent();
        DataContext = ViewModel;

        ViewModel.ProgressBarStatusChanged += ViewModel_ProgressBarStatusChanged;
        Loaded += MainWindow_Loaded;
    }

    void MainWindow_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        ViewModel.UpdateProgressBar();
    }

    void ViewModel_ProgressBarStatusChanged(object sender, ViewModels.MainWindow.CustomEventArgs.MainWindowEventArgs e)
    {
        Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(() => PbLoading.Value += e.Increment));
    }
}

The ViewModel - MainWindowViewModel.cs

public class MainWindowViewModel : BaseViewModel, IMainWindowViewModel, IMainWindowEventArgs
{
    private int _progress;

    public int Progress
    {
        get { return _progress; }
        set
        {
            _progress = value;
            base.OnPropertyChanged("Progess");
        }
    }

    public void UpdateProgressBar()
    {
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(x =>
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < 36; i++)
                {
                    Thread.Sleep(500);
                    //var temp = i;
                    //this.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(new Action(() => Progress = temp));
                    OnProgressBarStatusChanged(3);
                }
            });

    public event EventHandler<MainWindowEventArgs> ProgressBarStatusChanged;
    protected void OnProgressBarStatusChanged(int inc)
    {
        if (ProgressBarStatusChanged != null)
        {
            var temp = inc;
            ProgressBarStatusChanged(this, new MainWindowEventArgs{ Increment = temp });
        }
    }

    public MainWindowViewModel()
        : base()
    {

    }
}

This process works and it updates the Progress bar fine. But I wanted to use the property Progress as I mentioned before so I tried the commented code and removed the EventHandler. This wouldn't update the UI. I tried changing the PbLoading to ViewModel.Progress in the View class but this still wouldn't update the UI.

So I tried this solution

//this.Progress = 0;

        var sc = SynchronizationContext.Current;

        new Thread(new ThreadStart(() =>
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 36; i++)
            {
                sc.Post(p =>
                {
                    this.Progress += 3;
                }, null);
                Thread.Sleep(500);
            }

            //sc.Post(p =>
            //{
            //    this.Progress = 0;
            //}, null);

        })).Start();

Still no joy

I then tried this solution: http://www.rhyous.com/2010/12/29/a-progress-bar-using-wpfs-progress-bar-control-backgroundworker-and-mvvm/

    public void UpdateProgressBar()
    {
        var worker = new BackgroundWorker();

        worker.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(worker_DoWork);

        worker.RunWorkerCompleted += new RunWorkerCompletedEventHandler(worker_RunWorkerCompleted);

        worker.RunWorkerAsync();
    }

    void worker_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
    {
        var worker = sender as BackgroundWorker;

        for (int i = 0; i < 36; i++)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(500);
            Progress += 3;
        }
    }

    void worker_RunWorkerCompleted(object sender, RunWorkerCompletedEventArgs e)
    {
        // Completed flag
    }

But still it wouldn't update using the property.

I realise I'm probably missing something fundamental in all this and any help would be much appreciated...

Thanks

EDIT: Just as an aside. If I debug the program Progress is getting updated and the PropertyChanged event is firing

share|improve this question
    
Use the ReportProgress on the BackgroundWorker and make sure you implement INotifyPropertyChanged on the class where your property is. –  Big Daddy Mar 7 '13 at 12:15
    
INotifyPropertyChanged is implemented in the base class and this fires. The ReportProgress doesn't seem to work either if I increment the progress in the DoWork event and use the ProcessChanged event to update the property this has the same effect. The property increments and INotifyPropertyChanged is fired but the UI doesn't update... –  Tony L Mar 7 '13 at 12:36
    
I dont know if it is just a copying error, but your RaisePropertyChanged call is passing in the string "Progess" instead of "Progress". That would definitely prevent the property updates from propagating. –  Backlash Mar 7 '13 at 13:31
    
OMG!!! I never saw that. Typos FTW! Not :S Works now. Thanks man. I knew I was missing something –  Tony L Mar 7 '13 at 13:32
    
Glad I could help. Also, if you're using or able to use .NET 4.5, you can avoid those types of spelling errors by using [CallerMemberName] attribute. Others using reflection and/or lambda expressions to avoid that scenario as well. Been burned on that bug more times than I can count. –  Backlash Mar 7 '13 at 14:15

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