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I want to write to preferences last date of update data in application. So I did like this

Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
SharedPreferences settings = getSharedPreferences("OrderOnline", 0);
Long updDate = settings.getLong("lastupdate", 0);
Long currdate= cal.getTimeInMillis();
if (!(updDate == currdate)) {
Log.d("AMainActivity", "updDate = " + updDate + "; currdate = " + currdate);
...
Editor ed = settings.edit();
        ed.putLong("lastupdate", currdate);
        ed.commit();
}

But this is not what I want. How can I read and write current date in SharedPreferences? I do not want to use any of deprecated objects. Thank you.

P.S. I do want current DATE in Preferences, not seconds. Now (!(updDate == currdate)) will always be True.

UPD I add this

Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
SharedPreferences settings = getSharedPreferences("OrderOnline", 0);
Long updDate = settings.getLong("lastupdate", 0)/ MILLIS_PER_DAY;
Long currdate= cal.getTimeInMillis()/ MILLIS_PER_DAY;
if (!(updDate == currdate)) {
  Log.d("AMainActivity", "updDate = " + updDate + "; currdate = " + currdate);


...
  Editor ed = settings.edit();
        ed.putLong("lastupdate", currdate);
        ed.commit();
}

into {} This is the result

03-07 13:10:15.031: D/AMainActivity(9291): updDate = 15771; currdate = 15771

Something doesn't work.

share|improve this question
    
What's deprecated here? Btw. you can use System.currentTimeMillis() instead of using the Calendar. –  Ridcully Mar 7 '13 at 12:40
    
Nothing but I have not current DATE in preferences file. Now if-sentence will always be True. –  Foenix Mar 7 '13 at 12:43
1  
Well it's quite logical that the amount of time that a milliseond-value you write to the settings is the same as the current milliseconds if exactly one millisecond. So perhaps you do not want to compare at millisecond level but on day level? It this what you want? –  Ridcully Mar 7 '13 at 12:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use this to compare days instead of milliseconds:

long MILLIS_PER_DAY = 1000 * 60 * 60 * 24;
long updDate = settings.getLong("lastupdate", 0) / MILLIS_PER_DAY;
long currdate= System.currentTimeMillis() / MILLIS_PER_DAY;

if (!(upDate == currDate)) ...

A short unit-test to proove things: This writes "now that's what I thought" and "see, it works".

public void test() throws InterruptedException {
    long MILLIS_PER_DAY = 1000 * 60 * 60 * 24;
    long updDate = 0 / MILLIS_PER_DAY;
    long currDate = System.currentTimeMillis() / MILLIS_PER_DAY;

    if (!(updDate == currDate)) {
        System.out.println("now that's what I thought");
    }

    updDate = System.currentTimeMillis() / MILLIS_PER_DAY;
    Thread.sleep(5000);
    currDate = System.currentTimeMillis() / MILLIS_PER_DAY;

    if (!(updDate == currDate)) {
        System.out.println("now that's STRANGE");
    } else {
        System.out.println("see, it works");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, thank you! What is the difference beetwen cal.getTimeInMillis() and System.currentTimeMillis()? –  Foenix Mar 7 '13 at 12:59
    
I updated post, something doesn't work this way.. –  Foenix Mar 7 '13 at 13:09
    
I updated my code to use long primitives instead of Long objects -- because comparing the objects with == does not work as expected (we'd have to use update.equals(currDate)). –  Ridcully Mar 7 '13 at 13:21
1  
Calendar.getInstance().getTimeInMillis() and System.currentTimeMillis() give the same value but with System.currentTimeMillis() you do not create a Calendar object so it's better for memory usage and performance. –  Ridcully Mar 7 '13 at 13:22
1  
I added a short test method that prooves that you can compare longs :-) –  Ridcully Mar 7 '13 at 14:28

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