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I want to evaluate the performance of some code in different versions of R. This is easy enough in principle:

  • Start R
  • Use system.time() to measure the time it takes to run a piece of code
  • Terminate R
  • Rinse and repeat in a different version

Now, I want to use knitr to create a report to do this. So, it seems to me I need a mechanism to start a new session in each chunk.

How do I do this?


Some sample knitr markdown code to serve as a demonstration. This code plots a graphic using ggplot, but clearly both versions return identical timings, since I don't know how to start a new version of R for each chunk.

Comparison of R performance
========================================================

# Do analysis in R version 2.14

```{r fig.width=6, fig.height=3}
library(ggplot2)
data(diamonds)

system.time({
  p <- ggplot(diamonds, aes(carat, price/carat, colour=clarity)) + geom_point()
  print(p)
})
```


# Repeat same analysis in R 2.15

```{r fig.width=6, fig.height=3}
library(ggplot2)
data(diamonds)

system.time({
  p <- ggplot(diamonds, aes(carat, price/carat, colour=clarity)) + geom_point()
  print(p)
})
```
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2  
Couldn't you just have a bash script or whatnot do all the starting/stopping of R sessions, have each session write out its results to a file, and then use knitr to read all the log files in and summarize the results? Not as elegant, but maybe more accurate and easier. –  Ari B. Friedman Mar 7 '13 at 12:40
1  
@AriB.Friedman Yes, probably. But that sounds like work! –  Andrie Mar 7 '13 at 12:47
    
Reckon you need to use system() to run another R process... –  Spacedman Mar 7 '13 at 15:17
10  
Give me a few minutes and I'll add an Rscript engine in knitr. –  Yihui Mar 7 '13 at 21:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Adding the Rscript engine in knitr was easy, but I was held back by an R bug. Anyway, this engine is available since version 1.1.5 and will be on CRAN as version 1.2.

Now you can specify the chunk option engine='Rscript' and engine.path='path/to/the/desired/Rscript'.

For large scale performance comparisons, I think what Ari B. Friedman suggested in the comment above is a better way to go. It will be pretty tedious to type the engine paths if you have many code chunks for comparisons.

share|improve this answer
    
That's brilliant, thank you! –  Andrie Mar 10 '13 at 16:03

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