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I am not even sure this is possible, so I'd like a clarification. I have a parent class with const array of strings and I would like it to be initialized by its child classes, such as:

class CParent{
  CParent();
  const char** strings;
};

and child class

class CChild:CParent{
  CChild();
};

CChild::CChild()
: CParent::strings{
  "First",
  "Second"
}
{
  CParent();
  // some code
}

I need this because I will be calling CParent's constructor and there I need to use the strings. It can be done by passing it through argument, but I was wondering if something like this was possible.


Edit: I forgot to write a few things when rewriting my code here, so I will rather copy-paste it so I don't forget anything now. I rewrote it using strings and vectors using Andy Prowl's help:

class CMenu {
public:
    CMenu(std::vector<std::string> const& s);
protected:
    std::vector<std::string> choicesStr;
};

CMenu::CMenu(std::vector<std::string> const & s) : choicesStr(s) {
    // code code
}

class CGameTypeMenu : public CMenu {
public:
    CGameTypeMenu();
};

CGameTypeMenu::CGameTypeMenu() 
 :CMenu(std::vector<std::string>("aaa","bbb")){ // This is where I 
                                                   get some nasty errors

}

The error looks like this:

In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.7/vector:63:0,
                 from CMenu.h:13,
                 from CGameTypeMenu.h:11,
                 from CGameTypeMenu.cpp:8:
/usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/stl_uninitialized.h:77:3:   required from ‘static _ForwardIterator std::__uninitialized_copy<_TrivialValueTypes>::__uninit_copy(_InputIterator, _InputIterator, _ForwardIterator) [with _InputIterator = const char*; _ForwardIterator = std::basic_string<char>*; bool _TrivialValueTypes = false]’
(5+ more similar lines follow)
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That's not a const array. It's a non-const array of const strings. –  Peter Wood Mar 7 '13 at 13:00
1  
CMenu(std::vector<std::string>("aaa","bbb")){ // This is where I get some nasty errors - because you can't do that without C++11 either. See my answer. –  LihO Mar 7 '13 at 13:32
    
I thought you meant that I can't do the CParent({"foo"}) version. Ok then –  Martin Melka Mar 7 '13 at 13:37
    
But in that case, I don't know how to call the constructor, when I have to declare the vector first –  Martin Melka Mar 7 '13 at 13:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could let the constructor of CChild call the constructor of CParent and pass your array as its argument. You might then actually end up trying to do something like this:

CChild() : CParent({ "First", "Second" }) { }

which is called brace initialization and it is is possible only with C++11 support. In case you need C++03 solution and you want to keep using const char* for storing strings, then :

class CParent {
public:
    CParent(const char* s[]) : strings(s) { }
    const char** strings;
};

class CChild : public CParent {
public:
    CChild() : CParent(strings_) { }
private:
    static const char* strings_[];
};

const char* CChild::strings_[] = { "First", "Second" };

just note that since strings_ is an array, this const member must be initialized in source file.

Although I recommend you to use std::vector instead of C-style arrays and std::string instead of C-style strings. In that case this code could look like this:

typedef std::vector<std::string> StringVector;

class CParent {
public:
    CParent(const std::vector<std::string>& s) : strings(s) { }
    const StringVector strings;
};

class CChild : public CParent {
public:
    CChild()
    : CParent(strings_) { }
private:
    static const std::string s_[];
    static const StringVector strings_;
};

const std::string CChild::s_[] = { "First", "Second" };
const StringVector CChild::strings_ =
  StringVector(CChild::s_, CChild::s_ + sizeof(CChild::s_)/sizeof(std::string));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. This explains it well –  Martin Melka Mar 7 '13 at 16:22

Just do it the right way (this solution works for C++11 only):

#include <vector>
#include <string>

class CParent
{
    protected:
//  ^^^^^^^^^^ Make sure your constructor is at least protected,
//             or it will be inaccessible to derived classes

    CParent(std::vector<std::string> const& s) : strings(s) { };

    std::vector<std::string> strings;
//  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Use containers and classes from the C++ Standard
//                           Library rather than raw pointers
};

class CChild : public CParent
//           ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I suppose you forgot this.
//                            Inheritance is private by
//                            default, which does not seem
//                            to be what you want   
{
    CChild();
};

CChild::CChild()
    :
    CParent({"First", "Second"}) // C++11 ONLY!
//          ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
//          Implicit construction of the vector of string
{
    // some code
}
share|improve this answer
2  
AFAIK CParent({"First", "Second"}) is possible only with C++11 support. –  LihO Mar 7 '13 at 12:49
    
@LihO: Correct, let me edit. Thank you –  Andy Prowl Mar 7 '13 at 12:49
1  
Thanks, I was using const char* because I didn't know ncurses worked with strings; good to know. I changed the code according to your post, but I am getting errors when calling parent's constructor in initialization of the child. Please see the updated question. –  Martin Melka Mar 7 '13 at 13:29
1  
@MartinMelka: Sorry, I made a wrong assumption when writing code for C++03. This solution works for C++11 only. –  Andy Prowl Mar 7 '13 at 20:24

The only way to member initialize CParent members is through an appropriate CParent constructor.

As a workaround, you can initialize parent members through assignment in the child's constructor, if the parent members are accessible, i.e. protected or public.

This workaround is of course not possible, if the members were truly const, i.e.

const char ** const strings;

But the correct way is to keep the parent members private and provide a proper parent constructor.

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The only way to initialize const members of the base class is to pass the initializing arguments to a constructor of the base class in the initialization list of the derived class constructor, and the base constructor take this arguments to initialize the const member in his initialization list.

“Inside” any constructor (pass the initialization list) any member (derived or base) is already (default is not explicit) constructed, and const cannot be change anymore.

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