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I have 3 classes B, C, D, that derive from one base class A:

class A
{
// body
};

class B : public A
{
// body
};

class C : public A
{
// body
};

class D : public A
{
// body
};

I want to create a factory function that will let me create object of specific type (B, C or D) and return it as a pointer to A class:

typedef std::shared_ptr<A> a_ptr;

a_ptr createObject(int type)
{
    switch(type)
    {
    case 0:
        return a_ptr(new B());
    break;
    case 1:
        return a_ptr(new C());
    break;
    case 2:
        return a_ptr(new D());
    break;
    }
}

And then if I have for example a pointer of type B, I'd like to assign B object created by a factory to it. The only reasonable solution for that that came to my mind would be:

std::shared_ptr<B> b = std::shared_ptr<B>(dynamic_cast<B*>(createObject(0)));

But it looks ugly. Is there any better solution for that? Or maybe I should try different way of creating objects with my function?

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2  
If you are creating objects based on a runtime value (here, int type) then there is no possibility of the return value being "correctly" typed (this would be possible if createObject were a template, but then you would only be able to create statically), so a cast is necessary. You could devise ways of hiding it, but IMHO that's not a good idea. Casts should be prominent. –  Jon Mar 7 '13 at 13:14
1  
C++ is statically typed. That is, you must know the type of each expression at compile time. (In your case, that should be type A.) –  Kerrek SB Mar 7 '13 at 13:15
2  
Note that shared_ptrs have their own cast methods. –  Daniel Frey Mar 7 '13 at 13:18
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want to perform a run-time downcast of a shared_ptr, rather use std::dynamic_pointer_cast<>:

std::shared_ptr<B> b = std::dynamic_pointer_cast<B>(createObject(0));

If the type of the object to be created is determined at run-time, and yours is an attempt to check whether the returned object has type B, then I do not see better alternatives than a dynamic downcast.

On the other hand, if you know with 100% certainty the pointed object has type B, then you could use std::static_pointer_cast<>:

std::shared_ptr<B> b = std::static_pointer_cast<B>(createObject(0));

In the moment you know this with 100% certainty, however, I do not see why such an instruction should not become:

std::shared_ptr<B> b = std::make_shared<B>();
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1  
Also, I think it's important to note that the need for dynamic casting is code smell in most cases. You have your common base class so you can avoid casting. Virtual functions should allow you to get the different behavior of each class. And if you need to cast to access something in a derived class, then your calling code will be a big if-else or switch case anyway, which suggests your classes maybe should not be related by deriving from a common base. –  Tamás Szelei Mar 7 '13 at 13:30
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For small number of "types" your createObject does not look too bad. It only gets ugly if there are many "types". Then you could be better off by creating a table mapping type to the respective class's factory function. For example:

std::map<int, std::function <a_ptr ()> > dispatcherTable = 
{
    {0, createB },
    {1, createC },
    {2, createD }
};

Then you can just use your 'type' as an index into the table:

new_a = dispatcherTable[a]();

Those "createB", "createC" and so on could be static members of your factory class or static members of B, C and so on classes. Any way you want it.

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This works, but the switch-case is more readable. And I think this is not what OP was asking about. –  Tamás Szelei Mar 7 '13 at 13:25
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