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"C is fast, Java is slow", right?

I compared the times table example from Video2Brain's Objectiv-C 3.0 tutorial for a)  Eclipse/Java and b) XCode/Objectiv-C on a MacBook Pro Quadcore. The result absolutely surprised me. Java is 3 times faster than the Objective-C implementation. Java: 0.718s compared to Objective-C: 2.416s.

Question: What do I miss? How can this be explained? Thanks!

a) Java Code:

public static void main(String[] args) {

int timesTable[][] = new int[10][10];
long beginTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

// 10 000 000 x
for (int count = 0; count < 10000000; count++) {
   for (int row = 0; row < 10; row++) {
      for (int col = 0; col < 10; col++) {
         timesTable[row][col] = (row +1) * (col +1);
      }
   }
 }
 long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
 System.out.println("Time elapsed = " + (endTime - beginTime) + "ms");
 }

b) Objective-C Code

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
int timesTable[10][10];

CFAbsoluteTime beginTime = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent();

 // 10 000 000 x
for (int count = 0; count < 10000000; count++) {
  for (int row = 0; row < 10; row++) {
    for (int col = 0; col < 10; col++) {
       timesTable[row][col] = (row +1) * (col +1);
    }
  }
}
 CFAbsoluteTime endTime = CFAbsoluteTimeGetCurrent();
 NSLog(@"Time elapsed = %f", endTime - beginTime);
}

UPDATE

@nhahtdh Compiler Options: Compiler: Apple LLVM compiler 4.2

@jlordo: I get same result, when I change to timesTable[row][column] = (row +1) * (column +1) * count

@uchuugaka: Right, I agree its basicly C compared to Java. I run the test five times both. System was restarted. No other applications running.

@Anoop Vaidya: Yes, newest version, I get the same times, no differ LLVM GCC 4.2 or Apple LLVM compiler 4.2

UPDATE2

@justin: Thanks, problem solved. Build Settings -> Optimization Level

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6  
Just a guess, but Java probably detects that you are doing useless work, and bail out early. –  nhahtdh Mar 7 '13 at 13:27
1  
@nhahtdh yes, HotSpot JIT Compiler does a pretty well job on this. –  jlordo Mar 7 '13 at 13:28
1  
Another guess- Java is 3 times better? –  vikingsteve Mar 7 '13 at 13:29
1  
Another thing I forgot to mention: What options did you compile your Obj-C version with? –  nhahtdh Mar 7 '13 at 13:30
1  
What times do you get if you change the inner assignment to timesTable[row][column] = (row +1) * (column +1) * count; That would change memory content on every step, instead of one iteration and then many no-ops. –  jlordo Mar 7 '13 at 13:33
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closed as not constructive by millimoose, Mark Rotteveel, Monolo, Brian Roach, Jaguar Mar 7 '13 at 16:56

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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Your 'benchmark' is flawed. The C optimizer (for the ObjC test) should realize that the whole loop can be removed. Speed comparisons should be performed with optimizations enabled (e.g. -O3). When running the test with optimization enabled, the time elapsed for the above program is 0.0 seconds (yes, I tested and confirmed that).

A better benchmark must be devised.

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Not to mention that micro-benchmarks are generally a complete waste of time outside of very specific algorithm tests. Micro-benchmarks are entirely useless when it comes to measuring performance in any kind of a GUI based application. –  bbum Mar 7 '13 at 16:22
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Most likely it is an inaccurate benchmark.

Read this:

How do I write a correct micro-benchmark in Java?

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1  
That answer neatly summarises to "you probably don't want to bother" –  millimoose Mar 7 '13 at 13:42
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