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I just want to read a file using the function CreateFile such as following :

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>
int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    PIMAGE_DOS_HEADER pImageDosHeader;
    HANDLE hFile = NULL;
    HANDLE hMapObject;
    PUCHAR uFileMap;
    if (argc < 2)
        return (-1);
    std::cout << "hFile=" << hFile << std::endl;
    if (!(hFile = CreateFile((LPCWSTR)argv[1], GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE, FILE_SHARE_READ,
        NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL, NULL)))
    {
        return (-1);
    } else {
        std::cout << argv[1] << std::endl;
        std::cout << "hFile=" << hFile << std::endl;
        getchar();
    }
    return (0);
}

The problem is that the output is like below :

hFile=000000 (the pointer is initialized to NULL -> OK)

hFile=FFFFFF (invalid pointer)

Does anyone can help me, please ? Thanks in advance for your help.

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2  
I think you'll find that it's actually 8 F's. That's the value for INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE. A hFile=0 is a valid result, -1 is invalid. You should call GetLastError() to give an answer as to "why is it invalid" - it could be many things, the most likely that you are trying to open an existing file that doesn't exist (e.g. you are in the wrong directory, perhaps?) –  Mats Petersson Mar 7 '13 at 14:11
3  
MSDN is your friend. Read the documentation. –  Alexey Frunze Mar 7 '13 at 14:12
    
I'd recommend you run it through a debugger and put a breakpoint before CreateFile and take a look to see if argv[1] is the value you expect it to be and also check the file exists. As mentioned above "msdn is your friend" so look here msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/windows/desktop/… –  Rich Mar 7 '13 at 14:17
    
Others have pointed out the problem with 0 being a valid handle (where you expect it not to be). I believe the cause of getting the invalid handle is casting argv[1] to (LPCWSTR). This tells the program "take this array of ASCII characters and iterpret the bytes therein as wide characters." Not what you want, I believe. Either use wmain(), or call CreateFileA(). –  Angew Mar 7 '13 at 14:19
    
Hello, yes the getLastError() return the value 2. My file is in my VS project. So I just added the name of my file (test1.txt containing the string "Hello world") . To be sure I added in my code a std::ifstream ifs(argv[1]) + just below a loop with a getline. After execution I print the buffer which contains the string "Hello world". So it's not a file path problem. –  user1364743 Mar 7 '13 at 14:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The following:

if (!(hFile = CreateFile(...)))

is not how you check for errors.

From the documentation:

If the function fails, the return value is INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE. To get extended error information, call GetLastError.

INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE is -1, or 0xFFFFFFFFF in hex. You need to call GetLastError() to find out what happened.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello, yes the getLastError() return the value 2. My file is in my VS project. So I just added the name of my file (test1.txt containing the string "Hello world") . To be sure I added in my code a std::ifstream ifs(argv[1]) + just below a loop with a getline. After execution I print the buffer which contains the string "Hello world". So it's not a file path problem. What does the error 2 mean ? –  user1364743 Mar 7 '13 at 14:25
    
@user1364743: msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/windows/desktop/… –  NPE Mar 7 '13 at 14:25
    
thank you for your help –  user1364743 Mar 7 '13 at 14:38

When you get an error from most Win32 APIs, you can call GetLastError() to find out what went wrong. Take it from there.

This type of defensive programming is essential for productive Win32 programming. The actual conditions for a failure vary by API, so use MSDN to check what you should be looking for in your failure codepaths.

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