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My script is called by server. From server i'll receive ID_OF_MESSAGE and TEXT_OF_MESSAGE.

In my script i'll handle incomming text and generate response with params: ANSWER_TO_ID and RESPONSE_MESSAGE.

The problem is that I'm sending response to incomming "ID_OF_MESSAGE", but server which send me message to handle will set his message as delivered to me (it means I can send him response to that ID), after receiving http response 200.

One of solution is to save message to database and make some cron which will be running each minute, but i need to generate response message immidiatelly.

Is there some solution how to send to server http response 200 and than continue executing php script?

thank you a lot

share|improve this question

Yes. You can do this:

ignore_user_abort(true);
set_time_limit(0);

ob_start();
// do initial processing here
echo $response; // send the response
header('Connection: close');
header('Content-Length: '.ob_get_length());
ob_end_flush();
ob_flush();
flush();

// now the request is sent to the browser, but the script is still running
// so, you can continue...
share|improve this answer
1  
Is it possible to do it with a keep-alive connection ? – Congelli501 Jul 9 '14 at 19:14
2  
Excellent!! This is the only response to this question that actually works!!! 10p+ – Martin_Lakes Aug 1 '14 at 19:13
2  
Awesome answer! The only thing I changed was set_time_limit(0);. You do probably want it to run for longer than the default 30 seconds, but indefinitely could cause problems if it goes into an infinite loop! I have a longer value set in my php.ini file. – CJ Dennis Aug 21 '14 at 14:25
1  
is there a reason you use ob_flush after ob_end_flush? I understand the need for the flush function there at the end but I'm not sure why you would need ob_flush with ob_end_flush being called. – ars265 May 20 '15 at 13:40
2  
RE: Keep-alive connection: You do not necessarily need to have close the connection, but then what will happen is the next asset requested on the same connection will be forced to wait. So you could deliver the HTML fast but then one of your JS or CSS files might load slowly, as the connection has to finish getting the response from PHP before it can get the next asset. So for that reason, closing the connection is a good idea so the browser doesn't have to wait for it to be freed up. – Nate Haug Sep 17 '15 at 3:37

I've seen a lot of responses on here that suggest using ignore_user_abort(true); but this code is not necessary. All this does is ensure your script continues executing before a response is sent in the event that the user aborts (by closing their browser or pressing escape to stop the request). But that's not what you're asking. You're asking to continue execution AFTER a response is sent. All you need is the following:

    // Buffer all upcoming output...
    ob_start();

    // Send your response.
    echo "Here be response";

    // Get the size of the output.
    $size = ob_get_length();

    // Disable compression (in case content length is compressed).
    header("Content-Encoding: none");

    // Set the content length of the response.
    header("Content-Length: {$size}");

    // Close the connection.
    header("Connection: close");

    // Flush all output.
    ob_end_flush();
    ob_flush();
    flush();

    // Close current session (if it exists).
    if(session_id()) session_write_close();

    // Start your background work here.
    ...

If you're concerned that your background work will take longer than PHP's default script execution time limit, then stick set_time_limit(0); at the top.

share|improve this answer
1  
nice code! very useful! – Amy Neville Feb 12 at 10:13

Modified the answer by @vcampitelli a bit. Don't think you need the close header. I was seeing duplicate close headers in Chrome.

<?php

ignore_user_abort(true);

ob_start();
echo '{}';
header($_SERVER["SERVER_PROTOCOL"] . " 202 Accepted");
header("Status: 202 Accepted");
header("Content-Type: application/json");
header('Content-Length: '.ob_get_length());
ob_end_flush();
ob_flush();
flush();

sleep(10);
share|improve this answer
    
I mentioned this in the original answer, but I'll say it here too. You do not necessarily need to have close the connection, but then what will happen is the next asset requested on the same connection will be forced to wait. So you could deliver the HTML fast but then one of your JS or CSS files might load slowly, as the connection has to finish getting the response from PHP before it can get the next asset. So for that reason, closing the connection is a good idea so the browser doesn't have to wait for it to be freed up. – Nate Haug Sep 17 '15 at 3:42

I use the php function register_shutdown_function for this.

void register_shutdown_function ( callable $callback [, mixed $parameter [, mixed $... ]] )

http://php.net/manual/en/function.register-shutdown-function.php

Edit: The above is not working. It seems I was misled by some old documentation. The behaviour of register_shutdown_function has changed since PHP 4.1 link link

share|improve this answer
    
This is not what is being asked for - this function basically just extends the script termination event and is still part of the output buffer. – Fiskie Jan 3 at 14:48
    
@Fiskie You're right. I've added an edit. – martti Jan 8 at 11:15

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