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I'm a Python noob, and am trying to write a script to take two Intel hex files (one for my application code, one for a bootloader), strip the EOF record out of the first one, append the second file to the stripped version of the first, and save as a new file. I've got everything working, but then decided to get fancier: I want to ensure that the last line of the first file truly matches the Intel EOF record format. I can't seem to get the syntax for this conditional down correctly, though.

appFile = open("MyAppFile.hex", "r")
lines = appFile.readlines()
appFile.close()

appStrip = open("MyAppFile and BootFile.hex",'w')

if appStrip.readline[:] == ":00000001FF":  #Python complains about "builtin_function_or_method" not subscriptable here
    appStrip.writelines([item for item in lines[:-1]])
    appStrip.close()
else:
    print("No EOF record in last line. File may be corrupted.")

appFile = open("MyAppFile and BootFile", "r")
appObcode = appFile.read()
appFile.close()

bootFile = open("MyBootFile", "r")
bootObcode = bootFile.read()
bootFile.close()

comboData = appObcode + bootObcode

comboFile = open("MyAppFile and BootFile", "w")
comboFile.write(comboData)
comboFile.close()

Any other suggestions for a cleaner or safer version of this are welcome, too.

UPDATE: Added a line to print the last line; I am getting the expected output, but the comparison still fails every time. Here is current full program:

appFile = open("C:/LightLock/Master/Project/Debug/Exe/Light Lock.hex")

appLines = appFile.readlines()

appFile = open("MyAppFile.hex").read()

EOF = appLines[len(appLines)-1]

print(appLines[len(appLines)-1])

if not EOF == (":00000001FF"):
    print("No EOF record in last line of file. File may be corrupted.")
else:
    with open("MyAppFile Plus Boot", "a") as appStrip:
        appStrip.writelines([item for item in appLines[:-1]])

    with open("MyAppFile Plus Boot.hex", "r") as appFile:
        appObcode = appFile.read()

    with open("MyBootFile.hex", "r") as bootFile:
        bootObcode = bootFile.read()

    comboData = appObcode + bootObcode

    with open("MyAppFile Plus Boot.hex", "w") as comboFile:
        comboFile.write(comboData)

UPDATE2: Tried modifying the check to include a carriage return and line feed like so:

EOF = appLines[len(appLines)-1]

print(EOF)

if EOF != (":00000001FF","\r","\n"):
    print("No EOF record in last line of file. File may be corrupted.")

Still no luck.

share|improve this question
    
Maybe you have extra whitespace or non-printable characters in there? Try to print repr(EOF) instead of the line itself, this will give you the exact string representation. If it's whitespace, just call strip on EOF to remove it. Also, your comparison with the \r\n doesn't do what you think, you're comparing your variable EOF to a three-element tuple consisting of three strings :) –  l4mpi Mar 11 '13 at 13:13
    
Thanks, just arrived at the same conclusion myself. Good tip on print repr(EOF); I will keep that in mind moving forward. –  nobby Mar 11 '13 at 13:24

2 Answers 2

Here's a simpler version :

app = open("app.hex").read()
if not app.endswith(":00000001FF"):
   print("No EOF")
combo = open("combo.hex","w")
combo.write(app)
boot = open("boot.hex").read()
combo.write(boot)
combo.close() # it's automatic after program ended
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply, but it doesn't QUITE seem to work: I get the error message whether the string is at the end of the file or not. Here mine (slightly different): appLines = open("MyAppFile").read() if not appLines.endswith(":00000001FF"): print("No EOF record in last line of file. File may be corrupted.") –  nobby Mar 7 '13 at 15:53
    
Is it possible this is because there's a carriage return or something in the line that I can't see, and because I"m not checking for it its never true? –  nobby Mar 8 '13 at 13:39
    
Tried this with the same result (check always fails): appFile = open("C:/MyApp.hex") appLines = appFile.readlines() EOF = appLines[len(appLines)-1] if not EOF == (":00000001FF"): print("No EOF record in last line of file. File may be corrupted.") –  nobby Mar 8 '13 at 13:40

Finally figured it out: I wrote some test code to output the length of the string that Python was reading. Turns out it was 12 chars, though only 11 were displayed. So I knew one of the "invisible" chars must be the carriage return or line feed. Tried both; turned out to be line feed (new line).

Here's the final (working, but "unoptimized") code:

appFile = open("MyAppFile.hex")

appLines = appFile.readlines()

appFile = open("MyAppFile.hex").read()

EOF = appLines[len(appLines)-1]

if EOF != (":00000001FF\n"):
    print("No EOF record in last line of file. File may be corrupted.")
else:
    with open("MyAppFile and Boot.hex", "a") as appStrip:
        appStrip.writelines([item for item in appLines[:-1]])

    with open("MyAppFile and Boot.hex", "r") as appFile:
        appObcode = appFile.read()

    with open("MyBootFile.hex", "r") as bootFile:
        bootObcode = bootFile.read()

    comboData = appObcode + bootObcode

    with open("MyAppFile and Boot.hex", "w") as comboFile:
        comboFile.write(comboData)
share|improve this answer

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