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What does the "B" do in this pack statement from Perl code?

$hce_hash=pack('B*', $hce_hash);

Is there an equivalent function in PHP?

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Wrong place to ask such Question! –  Krishnachandra Sharma Mar 7 '13 at 14:59
1  
As you have already been told, this site is where you write code an we help you when it has problems. This site is not where we teach you programming or translate for you. stackoverflow.com/questions/15273113/perl-to-php-function –  Joel Berger Mar 7 '13 at 15:06
3  
If you compare the respective documentation(Perl, PHP) you should be able to realize that there isn't really an equivalent. However, this is an interesting question; it would be good if someone came up with a workaround. –  amon Mar 7 '13 at 15:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

PHP’s pack doesn’t support a format of B*, but it does support H*. In Perl, you could emulate it with

sub pack_Bstar {
  my($bits) = @_;
  my $Hstar;

  my $nybble = 0;
  for (my $i = 0; $i < length $bits; ++$i) {
    $nybble *= 2;
    $nybble += int substr($bits, $i, 1);
    if ($i % 4 == 3) {
      $Hstar .= sprintf "%x", $nybble;
      $nybble = 0;
    }
  }

  my $pad = 4 - length($bits) % 4;
  if ($pad != 4) {
    $nybble = ($nybble << $pad);
    $Hstar .= sprintf "%x", $nybble;
  }

  pack "H*", $Hstar;
}

The code above is not idiomatic Perl, but translation to PHP should be straightforward.

The H* format wants a hex string with high nybble (4 bits) first. The code above chews off four bits at a time to compute each nybble value. For example, for a bit string of 1011, tracing the algorithm gives

  1. nybble = 0
  2. nybble = 2 * 0 + 1 = 1
  3. nybble = 2 * 1 + 0 = 2
  4. nybble = 2 * 2 + 1 = 5
  5. nybble = 2 * 5 + 1 = 11

10112 is indeed 1110, which is b16. If the last nybble is incomplete (between one and three bits), we left-shift the bit the appropriate number of places. This has the effect of zero-padding on the right.

Tests:

my @tests = (
  ["01001010011101010111001101110100"                               => "Just"],
  ["0110000101101110011011110111010001101000011001010111001"        => "another"],
  ["01010000010010000101000000101111010100000110010101110010011011" => "PHP/Perl"],
  ["01101000011000010110001101101011011001010111001000101100"       => "hacker,"],
);

for (@tests) {
  my($input,$expect) = @$_;
  my $got = pack_Bstar $input;
  print "$input: ", ($got eq $expect ? "PASS" : "FAIL"), " ($got)\n";
}

Output:

01001010011101010111001101110100: PASS (Just)
0110000101101110011011110111010001101000011001010111001: PASS (another)
01010000010010000101000000101111010100000110010101110010011011: PASS (PHP/Perl)
01101000011000010110001101101011011001010111001000101100: PASS (hacker,)
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That's crazy inefficient. If the language doesn't have a means of converting from binary to a number, you should create a lookup table of the bit patterns for 0..15 –  ikegami Mar 8 '13 at 5:22

pack 'B*', $s returns the bytes represented by the string of 0 and 1 characters that form up the string in $s. The value of $s is right-padded with zeros to a length divisible by 8 if necessary.

For example,

pack 'B*', '0100101000110101'

results in

chr(0b01001010) . chr(0b00110101);
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As others have noted, PHP's pack() does not support the B template, which in Perl's pack() turns a bitstring, represented as a literal string of 0 and 1 characters, into a packed byte string with 8 bits per byte.

However, since PHP's pack() does support the H template, which does the same except for hexadecimal digits instead of bits, we can emulate Perl's B template in PHP by first using base_convert() to turn the bits into hex digits and then packing those:

function pack_B( $bits, $len = false ) {
    // truncate input to desired length, if given:
    if ( $len === false ) $len = strlen( $bits );
    else $bits = substr( $bits, 0, $len );

    // pad input with zeros to next multiple of 4 above $len:
    $hexlen = (int)( ($len + 3) / 4 );
    $bits = str_pad( $bits, 4*$hexlen, "0" );

    // split input into chunks of 4 bits, convert each to hex and pack them:
    $nibbles = str_split( $bits, 4 );
    foreach ( $nibbles as $i => $nibble ) {
        $nibbles[$i] = base_convert( $nibble, 2, 16 );
    }
    return pack( "H*", implode( "", $nibbles ) );
}

(The reason we can't just feed the whole input string to base_convert() is that it stores its intermediate result as a PHP float, and thus doesn't produce correct results for numbers too large to be accurately represented by a float. Doing it one hex digit at a time works fine, however.)

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