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Just need some clarification on view objects. If anything I mention here isn't clear, let me know.

Just a few questions:

What does creating a property do exactly for an object such as a label?

Why don't we need to create properties for certain buttons that we create?

Why do we have to create properties for certain view objects? I ask this because I had created a switch but I wanted to use it's value to send to my model, but I had to create a property to make it work. Is this related to the switch's getter and setter?

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closed as not constructive by Jeremy, Matt Busche, mtmurdock, Jaguar, Mark Oreta Mar 7 '13 at 17:19

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Yeah, it is not clear. Try to rephrase your questions. –  Mark Kryzhanouski Mar 7 '13 at 14:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What does creating a property do exactly for an object such as a label?

When you say "creating a property", I assume you mean creating an IBOutlet property in the view controller to reference the label in question. The purpose is to allow you to programmatically interact with that label (e.g. change the text it displays, etc.). If you're not going to be interacting with that label (e.g. its just a prompt), then no IBOutlet is needed. But if you need to interact with it (e.g. change its value based upon some other user input elsewhere), then you might have an IBOutlet.

Why don't we need to create properties for certain buttons that we create?

You only need to create IBOutlet references for those objects you'll be interacting with programmatically (e.g. changing the text on the button, retrieving the value of a switch), but otherwise you don't need an IBOutlet property. You might, in the case of a button, have an IBAction, or if using segues, you might not even need that. You often don't need IBOutlet property references for buttons at all (but you can have one if you need it for any reason).

But in short, you only need to create IBOutlet property references for those controls that you'll be interacting with in your own code.


Why do we have to create properties for certain view objects? I ask this because I had created a switch but I wanted to use it's value to send to my model, but I had to create a property to make it work. Is this related to the switch's getter and setter?

If you want to access the status of the UISwitch from some random method, then, yes, the getter method will make it easy for you to do so. And by defining a property, the getter method will be synthesized for you.

On the other hand, if you have a IBAction associated with the "value changed" event for your UISwitch, you can access it from the sender parameter with no additional property needed.

- (IBAction)changedSwitchValue:(id)sender
{
    UISwitch *switchControl = sender;

    if (switchControl.on)
        NSLog(@"Switch is on");
    else
        NSLog(@"Switch is off");
}

But if you want to access the on property of the UISwitch from other methods, having an IBOutlet property reference is quite useful.

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By the way, the Cocoa Fundamentals Guide has a discussion on outlets, though I hesitate to present it because it focuses on instance variables (which is technically right, but the modern convention is to use properties, for which the compiler will instantiate the necessary instance variables for us, and to not declare the ivars ourselves anymore). Nonetheless, the Cocoa Fundamentals Guide is a good read. –  Rob Mar 7 '13 at 15:26
    
What is the purpose of making an IBAction that is clearly only for a switch an (id) instead of (UISwitch)? –  The Muffin Man Nov 24 '13 at 22:32
    
@LéMuffinMan It's more of a historic convention than anything else (and when you look at the Target-Action discussion they use id, too). But you can declare the sender parameter to be a UISwitch * pointer directly, rather than a generic id pointer, if you prefer. When you create your IBAction in Interface Builder, while it defaults to id, you have the option to declare the "Type" of the action to be either id or UISwitch *. –  Rob Nov 25 '13 at 2:52

What does creating a property do exactly for an object such as a label?

Properties are used to generate getters and setters for instance variables You can implement the same accessors by hand. in case you are talking about IBOutlet then it is the way to interact between GUI object & code (where you access the properties of the object), IBOutlet becomes a connection between the Object added on the user interface and the code

Why don't we need to create properties for certain buttons that we create?

Sometimes when you create an object programatticaly without using the .xib or GUI then you don't need to create the IBOutlet instead you could use only a property without outlet in your class to access the properties of the object, but in this case you will have to manually set all the methods as selector for the objects e.g in case of UIButton .

You can find good references here to get to know how it works in practice

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