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I'm working on switch statements and I've been trying to make this code right here work, but it doesn't seem to output the correct console.log case string.

var user = prompt("What is your name?").toLowerCase();
switch(user){
    case "luka":
    console.log("What a beautiful name, my name is exactly the same :) Hi Luka! :D");
    break;

    case user.length > 10:
    console.log("That's a long name!");
    break;

    case user.length < 4:
    console.log("Not to be rude or impolite to you in any way, but your name is kinda       short :( Not that it isn't cool or something :D");
    break;

}

I've tried putting paranthesis around the user like this (user).length < 4, but that doesn't work, nor some of my other tries. Does anybody know how to implement this correctly?

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Why would you want to use a switch statement like this? –  epascarello Mar 7 '13 at 15:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is one possible workaround for using switch in the cases like yours:

var user = prompt("What is your name?").toLowerCase();
switch (true) {
    case (user === "luka"):
        console.log("What a beautiful name, my name is exactly the same :) Hi Luka! :D");
        break;

    case (user.length > 10):
        console.log("That's a long name!");
        break;

    case (user.length < 4):
        console.log("Not to be rude or impolite to you in any way, but your name is kinda       short :( Not that it isn't cool or something :D");
}

However I'd follow @epascarello's advice and use if/else blocks.

share|improve this answer
    
The performance of this is bad, ran tests awhile back. –  epascarello Mar 7 '13 at 15:06
    
This does work, but it's more code than an if - else sequence would be :-) –  Pointy Mar 7 '13 at 15:06
    
Absolutely so. That's why no one uses such construction :) –  VisioN Mar 7 '13 at 15:07
    
This definitely works, but I am very curious in knowing why my way of doing doesn't work? Why do I have to swap out user with true instead of just keeping the user variable inside the switch statement's parenthesis? Do you maybe know why? :S –  user2097217 Mar 7 '13 at 15:11
    
I'm learning, experimenting, trying out. Still very new to JavaScript, and I like testing out various stuff in different ways, so it doesn't matter to me if someone doesn't use such a construction. –  user2097217 Mar 7 '13 at 15:13

You should not use conditionals in a switch statement.

Use if/else if

var user = prompt("What is your name?").toLowerCase();
if (user==="luka") {
    console.log("What a beautiful name, my name is exactly the same :) Hi Luka! :D");
} else if (user.length > 10) {
    console.log("That's a long name!");
} else if (user.length < 4) {
    console.log("Not to be rude or impolite to you in any way, but your name is kinda       short :( Not that it isn't cool or something :D");
} else {
    console.log("in else");
}
share|improve this answer
    
THere is not workaround besides using if/else if/else? –  user2097217 Mar 7 '13 at 15:00
2  
Why not? stackoverflow.com/questions/3463833/… –  j08691 Mar 7 '13 at 15:00

That's just not how JavaScript switch statements work. The values in the "case" expressions are compared to the value of the switch expression.

The statement you have there is equivalent to:

if (user === "luka") {
    console.log("What a beautiful name, my name is exactly the same :) Hi Luka! :D");
}
else if (user === (user.length > 10)) {
    console.log("That's a long name!");
}
else if (user === (user.length < 4)) {
    console.log("Not to be rude or impolite to you in any way, but your name is kinda       short :( Not that it isn't cool or something :D");    
}

Thus, you're comparing the value of "user" to the results of comparing user.length to those values. Those comparison results are boolean, so "use" will never be === to them.

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So I cannot do something like that, I have to use if and else? Or??? –  user2097217 Mar 7 '13 at 15:02
    
@user2097217 you have to use if; that's just not how switch statements work. See my expanded explanation. –  Pointy Mar 7 '13 at 15:04
    
but again, if user === user.length > 10 which then becomes true is should console.log("Thestringhere"); –  user2097217 Mar 7 '13 at 15:15
    
@user2097217 The code in this answer is NOT the solution. It is showing you EXACTLY what is happening in your code. –  epascarello Mar 7 '13 at 15:17
    
No, that's equivalent to user === (true) or user === (false), which will never be true because a string is never === to a boolean. –  Pointy Mar 7 '13 at 15:17

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