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Using this very simple piece of code

import java.util.Properties

class MyProperties extends Properties

object MyProperties {

    def get(): MyProperties = new MyProperties

    def anotherMethod(): MyProperties = new MyProperties

}

the get() method is missing in the compiled code; a Java decompilation of the MyProperties class yields (scala signature omitted)

import java.util.Properties;
import scala.reflect.ScalaSignature;

public class MyProperties extends Properties
{
  public static MyProperties anotherMethod()
  {
    return MyProperties..MODULE$.anotherMethod();
  }
}

If MyProperties does not extend java.util.Properties however, the get() method is generated.

java.util.Properties inherits the public V get(Object key) from java.util.Dictionary but that is a non static method with a different signature.

Why is the (static) get() method missing in the generated bytecode?

Scala 2.10.1-rc2 - JVM 1.6.0_41

Edit Same issue with 2.10.0

Edit 2 This "works" in java

import java.util.Properties;

public class MyPropertiesjava extends Properties {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    public static MyProperties get() {

        return new MyProperties();
    }

    public static MyProperties antotherMethod() {

        return new MyProperties();
    }
}

Edit 3 A small edit to Régis workaround below (the type cannot be "global")

import java.util.Properties

class MyPropertiesImpl extends Properties

object MyProperties {

    type MyProperties = MyPropertiesImpl

    def get(): MyProperties = new MyPropertiesImpl

    def anotherMethod(): MyProperties = new MyPropertiesImpl

}

Edit 4 Issue tracked by Typesafe team here

share|improve this question
    
Your variation to my work around has the disadvantage that now you cannot just say MyProperties to refer to the class. It's true that you cannot define a type alias at the global scope, but you could put it in a package object. – Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 7 '13 at 16:20
    
The problem is that this scala class is called by legacy java code which cannot be "wrapped" by a package object. Your comment is obviously perfectly valid bu this solution nonetheless "works": calling MyProperties.get() transparently returns an instance of MyPropertiesImpl which has all the methods of the original java object. As long as you don't cast to MyProperties on the way you are safe, if not too bad... – Bruno Grieder Mar 7 '13 at 16:33
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are not looking at the right classfile. Try to decompile MyProperties$.

UPDATE: My bad, I understand now that you were actually looking for the static forwarder for get. The reason it has disappeared from MyProperties.class, is because there is already a get method in class MyProperties (inherited from Properties) which would conflict with the autogenerated static forwarder (and so the compiler does *not generate it). See this other answer I made earlier, for more context: http://stackoverflow.com/a/14379529/1632462 However, I must say that you make a good point that normally there should be no conflict as they have different signatures (unlike the fact that one is static and the other one is not, as static and non-static methods share the same namespace on the JVM AFAIK). I guess the compiler took the easy route and just checks for the presence of the method name as opposed to check for the exact signature.

Here one way to fix it would be to rename MyProperties (and possibly add a type alias so that the API stays the same):

class MyPropertiesImpl extends Properties
type MyProperties = MyPropertiesImpl 
object MyProperties {
    def get(): MyProperties = new MyPropertiesImpl
    def anotherMethod(): MyProperties = new MyPropertiesImpl
}

Because MyProperties is no more the companion of MyPropertiesImpl the problem goes away.

share|improve this answer
    
It is available in MyProperties$, but non static. I need to make a static call, just like on anotherMethod – Bruno Grieder Mar 7 '13 at 15:22
    
Oh, I see. Well, look at this other answer: stackoverflow.com/a/14379529/1632462 (or read my update) – Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 7 '13 at 15:27
    
I get that the JVM does not allow a static and a non static method to have the same signature. However the signatures are different and it works well in java (see edit above). In the end, we have to change the method name or the class name as you did. This breaks a lot of the Java code we are trying to port to scala unless we do some major refactoring – Bruno Grieder Mar 7 '13 at 15:40
    
You don't have to break the interface as my workaround with the type alias shows. As for the fact that both methods have different signatures, I agree with you, this means that both could in principle be emitted. The compiler is probably more conservative (or lazy :) ) in its check than it needs to be. – Régis Jean-Gilles Mar 7 '13 at 15:43
    
My bad, I missed the type alias. This is a workable solution, thanks, although this is remains a workaround for a (non documented ?) weakness of the scala compiler – Bruno Grieder Mar 7 '13 at 15:48

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