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With CUDA I am trying to have compile-time optimizations with an array consisting of vectors (int2 in my case), but I am unable to achieve this in a clean manner. Let be more concrete, I am working on a problem which uses two constant arrays c and w. Array w consists of floats and array c consists of int2's. Now since these arrays are constant I want the compiler to perform compile-time optimizations, thereby effectively optimizing away the array accesses. For example, for the following two device functions the compiler unrolls the loop and optimizes away the array accesses by replacing it directly with the values of c and w:

__forceinline__ __device__ float someFunction1() {
  const int2  c[9] = {make_int2(0, 0), make_int2(1, 0), make_int2(0, 1), make_int2(-1, 0), make_int2(0, -1),
                      make_int2(1, 1), make_int2(-1, 1), make_int2(-1, -1), make_int2(1, -1)};
  const float w[9] = {4.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/36.0f, 1.0f/36.0f, 1.0f/36.0f, 1.0f/36.0f};
  #pragma unroll
  for (int i = 0; i < 9; ++i) {
    //Do something here, accessing c[i] and w[i]
  }
}

__forceinline__ __device__ float someFunction2() {
  const int2  c[9] = {make_int2(0, 0), make_int2(1, 0), make_int2(0, 1), make_int2(-1, 0), make_int2(0, -1),
                           make_int2(1, 1), make_int2(-1, 1), make_int2(-1, -1), make_int2(1, -1)};
  const float w[9] = {4.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/36.0f, 1.0f/36.0f, 1.0f/36.0f, 1.0f/36.0f};
  #pragma unroll
  for (int i = 0; i < 9; ++i) {
    //Do something here, accessing c[i] and w[i]
  }
}

Now, the problem is that I don't want to continuously declare c and w in each device function that uses c and w. I can declare w globally, but I am not allowed to declare c globally, because CUDA won't allow me to call the make_int2 constructor in a global variable. That is, the program below gives the error "can't generate code for non empty constructors or destructors on device":

//Declaring array c like this is not allowed
__device__ const int2  c[9] = {make_int2(0, 0), make_int2(1, 0), make_int2(0, 1), make_int2(-1, 0), make_int2(0, -1),
                               make_int2(1, 1), make_int2(-1, 1), make_int2(-1, -1), make_int2(1, -1)};
__device__ const float w[9] = {4.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/9.0f, 1.0f/36.0f, 1.0f/36.0f, 1.0f/36.0f, 1.0f/36.0f};

__forceinline__ __device__ float someFunction() {
  #pragma unroll
  for (int i = 0; i < 9; ++i) {
    //Do something here, accessing c[i] and w[i]
  }
}

My question is: how can I prevent the declaration of c and w in each function that accesses these variables and still have the compile-time optimizations that I want? Or stated otherwise: is there a work-around for declaring an array of vectors globally?

N.B.: I am aware that I can store c and w in global or __constant__ memory, but this won't give me the compile-time optimizations. __constant__ memory may also become problematic when accessed irregularly.

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Is it me or you re giving us to answer a circular dependent question? –  KiaMorot Mar 7 '13 at 15:31
    
And, by the way, in the second code sample you declare c in global memory and then in the N.B. after that you say in global memory you don't have optimizations. If you don't have optimization declaring in global memory why are you trying to do this in the second code sample? –  KiaMorot Mar 7 '13 at 15:33
    
constant memory will become less problematic, in any case, than global memory if the access pattern is irregular, I would say. –  KiaMorot Mar 7 '13 at 15:48
    
@KiaMorot: sorry for the confusion about the "global" term. What I meant is that usually you declare an array in global memory as device int2 c[9] without directly intializing it. In that case you later have intialize it, but then the compiler probably won't perform compile-time optimizations. On the other hand, if I declare an array and directly initialize it the compiler probably will perform constant folding, which effectively optimizes away the array accesses. –  Bart Mar 8 '13 at 10:09
    
@KiaMorot: as for the point concerning _constant_ vs global. Yes, _constant_ is in general faster than global in any case. I only made that remark to prevent that people would give me the advice to use _constant_ memory for my problem. –  Bart Mar 8 '13 at 10:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't know if this really enables what you're looking for in terms of compiler optimization, but casting the pointer from int to int2 seems to work for me:

#include <stdio.h>

  __device__ const int  ci[16] = {0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, -1, 0, 0, -1, 1, 1, -1, 1, -1, -1};

  __device__ const int2 *c = (const int2 *)ci;

  __global__ void mykernel(){

  int2 temp = c[1];
  int2 temp1 = c[4];
  printf("c[1].x = %d\n", temp.x);
  printf("c[4].y = %d\n", temp1.y);
  }

int main(){

  mykernel<<<1,1>>>();
  cudaDeviceSynchronize();
  printf("Done\n");
  return 0;
}

Note that const and __ constant__ are not the same thing. You can eliminate the const declaration from the variable definitions for c and ci, but I assume having it there would help the compiler achieve what you desire.

share|improve this answer
    
Compiling with --ptxas-options=-v shows pretty much the same register usage with your trick, which makes me incline that your trick seems to work. Pity my current application is not yet ready for a decent benchmark, being memory-bandwidth limited and not limited in computation. Thanks for showing this nice trick. It does require PTX ISA version 2.1 or later. And yes, I am aware of the difference between const and _constant_. –  Bart Mar 9 '13 at 12:04

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