Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
int main(){
 char a[80] = "Angus Declan R";
 char b[80];
 char *p,*q;
 p = a;
 q = b;
 while(*p != '\0'){
  *q++ = *p++;
 }
 *q = '\0';
 printf("\n p:%s q:%s \n",p,q);
 puts(p); //prints the string
 puts(q); //doesnt print the string
 return 0;
}

why the strings are not copied from p to q? when trying to print the q, it prints nothing

share|improve this question
1  
What is your question? –  munkhd Mar 7 '13 at 15:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have to reposition your pointers at the good position of the string before the display (so : p=a and q=b).

int main(){
 char a[80] = "Angus Declan R";
 char b[80];
 char *p,*q;
 p = a;
 q = b;
 while(*p != '\0'){
  *q++ = *p++;
 }
 *q = '\0';
 p=a;
 q=b;
 printf("\n p:%s q:%s \n",p,q);
 puts(p); //prints the string
 puts(q); //doesnt print the string
 return 0;
}

Note : You are probably lucky that : puts(p); "Print the string" It's probably because a and b are stored consecutively. If you have done something like :

 char a[80] = "Angus Declan R";
 char c[80] = {"\0"}; //example
 char b[80];

the puts(p); would have print nothing aswell.

share|improve this answer

add

p = a;
q = b;

again before

printf("\n p:%s q:%s \n",p,q);
 puts(p); //prints the string
 puts(q); //doesnt print the string

Because the p and q pointers are incremented in the while loop and they are not pointing any more in the beginning of the a and b char arrays

BTW and Just as remark:

You can replace this bloc of code

while(*p != '\0'){
  *q++ = *p++;
 }
 *q = '\0';

by

while(*q++ = *p++); // more simple ;-)
share|improve this answer

puts(p); //prints the string

This is just luck due the particular case of the situation. Both p and q are at the end of their respective strings.

share|improve this answer
    
but how does puts(p) prints the string from the beginning of the pointer –  Angus Mar 7 '13 at 15:34
    
what does printf print? –  UmNyobe Mar 7 '13 at 15:41
    
@Angus In brief , given the addess of a string , puts() will , print all the characters , till it encounters '\0' , puts() then converts this to '\n' –  Beagle Bone Mar 7 '13 at 15:42
    
@UmNyobe: For the comments its clear that as *p++ will be holding the character '\0' hence trying to print the p will produce no result. So Puts shouldnt have printed the string as it is now pointing to the address at the end of the string and not at the beginning of the string. –  Angus Mar 7 '13 at 16:59

Here's your code fixed

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
 char a[80] = "Angus Declan R";
 char b[80];
 char *p,*q;
 p = a;
 q = b;
 while(*p != '\0')
  *q++ = *p++;
    *q++ = '\0';
 p = a;
 q = b;

 printf("\n p:%s q:%s \n",p,q);
 puts(p); 
 puts(q); 
 return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

The strings are actually copied, and you can see that by typing this printf statement at the end:

 printf("\n a: %s b: %s \n", a, b);

However, you forgot something basic about the ++ operator. When you write *q++ = *p++ , it's the same as writing:

q = q + 1;
p = p + 1;
*q = *p;

So, by the end of your loop, p and q are pointing at your null character, which is obviously not what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah correct. But as it was pointing to nul , how is it possible that puts() could able to print the whole string? –  Angus Mar 7 '13 at 18:02
    
I'm not sure, when I run your code on my computer, it doesn't output the whole string. –  naxchange Mar 7 '13 at 18:03
    
with printf() it didnt output the whole string, but when tried with puts(p), got the output of the whole string . –  Angus Mar 7 '13 at 18:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.