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I am trying to run this Perl program.

#!/usr/bin/perl
# ---------------     exchange.pl     -----------------

&read_exchange_rate;     # read exchange rate into memory

# now let's cycle, asking the user for input...

print "Please enter the amount, appending the first letter of the name of\n";
print "the currency that you're using (franc, yen, deutschmark, pound) -\n";
print "the default value is US dollars.\n\n";
print "Amount: ";

while (<STDIN>) {

  ($amnt,$curr) = &breakdown(chop($_));

  $baseval = $amnt * (1/$rateof{$curr});

  printf("%2.2f USD, ", $baseval * $rateof{'U'});
  printf("%2.2f Franc, ", $baseval * $rateof{'F'});
  printf("%2.2f DM, ", $baseval * $rateof{'D'});
  printf("%2.2f Yen, and ", $baseval * $rateof{'Y'});
  printf("%2.2f Pound\n\nAmount: ", $baseval * $rateof{'P'});
}

sub breakdown {
   @line = split(" ", $_);

   $amnt = $line[0];
   if ($#line == 1) {
     $curr = $line[1];
     $curr =~ tr/a-z/A-Z/;         # uppercase
     $curr = substr($curr, 0, 1);  # first char only
   } else { $curr = "U"; }
   return ($amnt, $curr);
}

sub read_exchange_rate {
  open(EXCHRATES, "

Whenever it gets to line 17 ($baseval = $amnt * (1/$rateof{$curr})), I get the error Illegal division by zero.

What's wrong?

I am new to Perl, so please explain your answer.

This only happens in Strawberry Perl. ActivePerl works, but it lists all the currency conversions as 0.0.

UPDATE: I changed the code to look like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl

&read_exchange_rate;     # read exchange rate into memory

# now let's cycle, asking the user for input...

print "Please enter the amount, appending the first letter of the name of\n";
print "the currency that you're using (franc, yen, deutschmark, pound) -\n";
print "the default value is US dollars.\n\n";
print "Amount: ";

while (<STDIN>) {

  ($amnt,$curr) = &breakdown(chomp($_));

  $baseval = eval { $amnt * (1/$rateof{$curr}) };

  printf("%2.2f USD, ", $baseval * $rateof{'U'});
  printf("%2.2f Franc, ", $baseval * $rateof{'F'});
  printf("%2.2f DM, ", $baseval * $rateof{'D'});
  printf("%2.2f Yen, and ", $baseval * $rateof{'Y'});
  printf("%2.2f Pound\n\nAmount: ", $baseval * $rateof{'P'});
}

sub breakdown {
   @line = split(" ", $_);

   $amnt = $line[0];
   if ($#line == 1) {
     $curr = $line[1];
     $curr =~ tr/a-z/A-Z/;         # uppercase
     $curr = substr($curr, 0, 1);  # first char only
   } else { $curr = "U"; }
   return ($amnt, $curr);
}

sub read_exchange_rate {
  open EXCHRATES, "<exchange.db" or die "$!\n";

  while ( <EXCHRATES> ) {
    chomp; split;
    $curr = $_[0];
    $val  = $_[1];
    $rateof{$curr} = $val;
  }
  close(EXCHRATES);
}

Now, I'm getting this in Strawberry Perl when I use Open With(Yes, I'm on Windows): No such file or directory But if I double-click it, it starts fine, but the session looks kind of like this:

Please enter the amount, appending the first letter of the name of
the currency that you're using (franc, yen, deutschmark, pound) -
the default value is US dollars.

Amount: 5 y
0.00 USD, 0.00 Franc, 0.00 DM, 0.00 Yen, and 0.00 Pound

Amount:

Something is obviously wrong. I already changed all instances of chop to chomp. What do I do now?

share|improve this question
    
When does that code from date from? It's really nasty-looking Perl4-style code. Far better Perl tutorials exist. See perl-tutorial.org. –  Dave Cross Mar 7 '13 at 15:52
    
That isn't a tutorial. It is from SAMS Teach Yourself UNIX in 24 Hours. That code was written in 1999 for Perl 5. It was never meant to be a tutorial; it was just there as a example program. –  kirbyfan64sos Mar 7 '13 at 19:55
    
If it's in a book called "Teach Yourself..." then, yes, it is a tutorial. Perl has moved on a lot in the fourteen years since that book was written. And it seems that the author wasn't particularly up to date even then as chop() went out of date in 1994. I really recommend that you throw that book away. You are unlikely to learn anything useful from it. –  Dave Cross Mar 7 '13 at 20:17
    
IT WAS ON UNIX!!! That book is on UNIX, not Perl. That snippet was just an example intended to spike intrest in Perl. It has been very useful in making me more comfortable with the shell. Plus, the author's system probably just had an older vesion of Perl. –  kirbyfan64sos Mar 7 '13 at 20:34
1  
Just because its a book on unix doesn't mean that its Perl code isn't unusably out of date. –  Joel Berger Mar 7 '13 at 23:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The reason your code doesn't work is that chop returns the character removed from the end of the string, not the string with the last character removed. You should also be using chomp which is identical except that it returns the last character only if it is a newline. That avoids problems when the last line of a file isn't terminated with a newline.

In addition you must always start a Perl program with use strict and use warnings, and declare all variables at their first point of use.

You should also avoid calling subroutines with the ampersand & on the name. That hasn't been correct practice since Perl 4 - about twenty years ago. Your calls should look like

read_exchange_rate();
share|improve this answer
    
so, chop; ($amnt,$curr) = &breakdown($_); –  Jonas Berlin Mar 7 '13 at 15:37
    
With use strict in place you want my ($amnt, $curr) = breakdown($_) –  Borodin Mar 7 '13 at 15:41
    
...except that breakdown takes no parameters, so my ($amnt, $curr) = breakdown() is correct. –  Borodin Mar 7 '13 at 17:04
    
"Learning Perl (6th ed.)" still recommends the use of the & always (until you've learned all the built-ins in Perl). So, other than being perhaps ugly and unneeded in most cases, does it actually hurt anything to use it? –  Craig Treptow Mar 7 '13 at 19:19
    
So then that part should look like this: ($amnt,$curr) = &breakdown (chomp($_)); And if I add use strict, it'll look like this: my ($amnt,$curr) = &breakdown (chomp($_)); Quick question: What the heck does my do? –  kirbyfan64sos Mar 7 '13 at 20:00

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