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I have a ViewState holding a List<T>

public List<AwesomeInt> MyList
{
  get { return ((List<int>)ViewState["MyIntList"]).Select(i => new AwesomeInt(i)).ToList(); }
  set { ViewState["MyIntList"] = value.GetIntegers(); }
}

Now, when I call MyList.Add(new AwesomeInt(3)) let's say, the list does not persist the change.

I believe this is because the .ToList() in the get is creating a new List object and therefore the set will never be called, thus never saving in ViewState.

I have worked around this problem before by either

  1. not calling .Select/.ToList() by saving/calling directly without a conversion.
  2. not using the .Add or .Remove functions and instead re-initializing the List with an equals.

However sometimes 1. is impractical if the class is not serializable and I have no control over that, and 2. is kind of ugly because I have to copy it to a temp first, then add, then re-assign, or play around with Concat to add a single item.

Is there a better way of doing this?

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Is there a reason you can't just work with the list directly (e.g. return (List<int>)ViewState["MyIntList"];? I mean what exactly is AwesomeInt and why aren't you storing that? Is it not serializable? –  Michael Perrenoud Mar 7 '13 at 15:31
    
in some cases I have no control of it and cannot make it serializable –  happygilmore Mar 7 '13 at 15:34
    
possible duplicate of How to store list of object into ViewState –  naed21 Aug 5 '13 at 19:57

1 Answer 1

Alright, below is a fully functional console application that should give you the capabilities you need. I leveraged generics so that you could build surrounding collections of whatever type necessary - but yet serialize something more rudimentary. Keep in mind I don't have a real view state to write to in the set but you can fix that up.

Also bear in mind I wrote this in a pretty short time frame (e.g. 20 minutes) so there may be optimizations that exist (e.g. the set on the ViewState property isn't really necessary generally because this solution modifies the underlying rudimentary data source).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Collections.ObjectModel;
using System.Collections.Specialized;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static List<int> _viewState = new List<int>();
        static RawCollection<AwesomeInt, int> ViewState
        {
            get { return new RawCollection<AwesomeInt, int>(_viewState); }
            set { _viewState = value.RawData; }
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            ViewState.Add(new AwesomeInt(1));
            ViewState.Add(new AwesomeInt(2));
            WriteViewState();

            ViewState[0].Val = 5;
            WriteViewState();

            ViewState.RemoveAt(0);
            WriteViewState();

            for (int i = 10; i < 15; i++)
            {
                ViewState.Add(new AwesomeInt(i));
            }
            WriteViewState();
        }

        private static void WriteViewState()
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < ViewState.Count; i++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("The value at index {0} is {1}.", i, ViewState[i].Val);
            }

            Console.WriteLine();
            Console.WriteLine();
        }
    }

    public class RawCollection<T, K> : Collection<T>
    {
        private List<K> _data;

        public RawCollection(List<K> data)
        {
            foreach (var i in data)
            {
                var o = (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), i);
                var oI = o as IRawData<K>;
                oI.RawValueChanged += (sender) =>
                {
                    _data[this.IndexOf((T)sender)] = sender.Val;
                };

                this.Add(o);
            }
            _data = data;
        }

        public List<K> RawData
        {
            get
            {
                return new List<K>(
                    this.Items.Select(
                        i => ((IRawData<K>)i).Val));
            }
        }

        protected override void ClearItems()
        {
            base.ClearItems();

            if (_data == null) { return; }
            _data.Clear();
        }

        protected override void InsertItem(int index, T item)
        {
            base.InsertItem(index, item);

            if (_data == null) { return; }
            _data.Insert(index, ((IRawData<K>)item).Val);
        }

        protected override void RemoveItem(int index)
        {
            base.RemoveItem(index);

            if (_data == null) { return; }
            _data.RemoveAt(index);
        }

        protected override void SetItem(int index, T item)
        {
            base.SetItem(index, item);

            if (_data == null) { return; }
            _data[index] = ((IRawData<K>)item).Val;
        }
    }

    public class AwesomeInt : IRawData<int>
    {
        public AwesomeInt(int i)
        {
            _val = i;
        }

        private int _val;
        public int Val
        {
            get { return _val; }
            set
            {
                _val = value;
                OnRawValueChanged();
            }
        }

        public event Action<IRawData<int>> RawValueChanged;

        protected virtual void OnRawValueChanged()
        {
            if (RawValueChanged != null)
            {
                RawValueChanged(this);
            }
        }
    }

    public interface IRawData<T> : INotifyRawValueChanged<T>
    {
        T Val { get; set; }
    }

    public interface INotifyRawValueChanged<T>
    {
        event Action<IRawData<T>> RawValueChanged;
    }
}
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