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I am synchronizing a huge database from it's oracle datasource to a mysql datasource for other purposes. When reading the data using PuTTY in a linux/oracle database the value is

8888888888

This is stored into an object and then inserted in MySQL and then ends up becoming

00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000008888888888

Now I am unfortunately no programming hero and I can't seem to figure out the problem. The datatype in both databases is int(10) and the C# Application does no no way tamper with any values. Here is the actual error message: (omitted irrelevant parts of the statement)

Error while executing query 
INSERT INTO tsdsmd(kode8) 
VALUES ('00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000008888888888')
Out of range value for column 'kode8' at row 1

Could it be a charset mismatch?

This is the code that builds the insert command

public int Insert(string table, string[] fields, object[] values)
{
    if (fields.Length != values.Length)
        throw new DBException("Field lengt is not equal to values length!");

    StringBuilder query = new StringBuilder();
    query.Append("INSERT INTO ");
    query.Append(table);
    query.Append("( ");
    for (int i = 0; i < fields.Length; i++)
    {
        query.Append(fields[i]);

        if (i != fields.Length - 1)
        {
            query.Append(", ");
        }
    }

    query.Append(") VALUES (");

    for (int i = 0; i < fields.Length; i++)
    {
        query.Append("@" + fields[i]);

        if (i != fields.Length - 1)
        {
            query.Append(", ");
        }
    }

    query.Append(")");

    DBCommand command = new DBCommand(query.ToString());

    for (int i = 0; i < fields.Length; i++)
    {
        command.AddParameter("@" + fields[i], values[i]);
    }

    return Insert(command);
}

Edit; I have changed some of the code and I am now skipping those rows for the while being with a separate try catch. Have a look and this is what I am seeing. The value shoudl be within the bounds of an int and I am so confused. Potential bug? The error it gives me that the int is too small or too large for an int32. Which should not be the case. Code screenshot

share|improve this question
    
This is stored into a string Why? How? –  ppeterka Mar 7 '13 at 15:34
    
There's no such thing as an INT column type in Oracle. Please post the table ddl in both ambients –  Sebas Mar 7 '13 at 15:36
    
Sorry to muddy up your post Davide. I am replying on my iPhone. Are the 0's being added to the insert statement? –  Brian Mar 7 '13 at 15:37
2  
@Sebas: Oracle does understand the datatype integer (you can use it in a create table statement). It's simply an alias for number(22): sqlfiddle.com/#!4/60926/1 –  a_horse_with_no_name Mar 8 '13 at 11:13
1  
@a_horse_with_no_name, yes but INT(10) fails. That was my point. The whole thing was to point out anyway that that putty extract is irrelevant. –  Sebas Mar 8 '13 at 11:53
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2 Answers

This looks to me like you may need to explicitly cast the value when adding the parameter. The value your code is trying to insert is the wrong data type and zero-padded, but it's technically correct. It should fix the problem if you do this:

command.AddParameter("@" + fields[i], (int)values[i])

Admittedly, that will be a bit of a pain if you're trying to deal with multiple data types dynamically, but it shouldn't be too tough to add a few tests to figure the value's proper data type.

share|improve this answer
    
Strange, it claims conversion is invalid. I'll look further into this. –  Davide Nguyen Mar 7 '13 at 16:10
1  
Maybe try an explicit conversion instead of a cast? My c# skills aren't super, so I may be doing this wrong. –  Jeff Rosenberg Mar 7 '13 at 16:11
    
Casting it does not seem to be the issue. I'm using convert, cast and parse but they all seem to return leading 000's for some reason. –  Davide Nguyen Mar 7 '13 at 16:27
    
Well, nuts. Sorry! –  Jeff Rosenberg Mar 7 '13 at 16:28
    
The problem is that 888888888 is larger than what int32 supports. Still cannot find out why it adds 000000000's when querying mysql. –  Davide Nguyen Mar 8 '13 at 11:10
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Actually, the column in oracle is not limited by int32 like "int" from mysql is. Will have to convert the mysql column to int64/long.

share|improve this answer
    
Note to self: 888888 value in kode8 was bogus test data apparently. Thanks db administrators. –  Davide Nguyen Mar 8 '13 at 11:40
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