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So I'm working through an RSPEC problem and all the help I've been getting on this site been great. I've hit a little snag with it though.

The idea is to create a dictionary Object in Ruby and the RSPEC code looks like

require 'dictionary'

describe Dictionary do
  before do
    @d = Dictionary.new
  end

  it 'is empty when created' do
    @d.entries.should == {}
  end

  it 'can add whole entries with keyword and definition' do
    @d.add('fish' => 'aquatic animal')
    @d.entries.should == {'fish' => 'aquatic animal'}
    @d.keywords.should == ['fish']
  end

  it 'add keywords (without definition)' do
    @d.add('fish')
    @d.entries.should == {'fish' => nil}
    @d.keywords.should == ['fish']
  end

  it 'can check whether a given keyword exists' do
    @d.include?('fish').should be_false
  end

  it "doesn't cheat when checking whether a given keyword exists" do
    @d.include?('fish').should be_false # if the method is empty, this test passes with nil returned
    @d.add('fish')
    @d.include?('fish').should be_true # confirms that it actually checks
    @d.include?('bird').should be_false # confirms not always returning true after add
  end

  it "doesn't include a prefix that wasn't added as a word in and of itself" do
    @d.add('fish')
    @d.include?('fi').should be_false
   end

  it "doesn't find a word in empty dictionary" do
    @d.find('fi').should be_empty # {}
  end

  it 'finds nothing if the prefix matches nothing' do
    @d.add('fiend')
    @d.add('great')
    @d.find('nothing').should be_empty
  end

  it "finds an entry" do
    @d.add('fish' => 'aquatic animal')
    @d.find('fish').should == {'fish' => 'aquatic animal'}
  end

  it 'finds multiple matches from a prefix and returns the entire entry (keyword + definition)' do
    @d.add('fish' => 'aquatic animal')
    @d.add('fiend' => 'wicked person')
    @d.add('great' => 'remarkable')
    @d.find('fi').should == {'fish' => 'aquatic animal', 'fiend' => 'wicked person'}
  end

  it 'lists keywords alphabetically' do
    @d.add('zebra' => 'African land animal with stripes')
    @d.add('fish' => 'aquatic animal')
    @d.add('apple' => 'fruit')
    @d.keywords.should == %w(apple fish zebra)
  end

  it 'can produce printable output like so: [keyword] "definition"' do
    @d.add('zebra' => 'African land animal with stripes')
    @d.add('fish' => 'aquatic animal')
    @d.add('apple' => 'fruit')
    @d.printable.should == %Q{[apple] "fruit"\n[fish] "aquatic animal"\n[zebra] "African land animal with stripes"}
  end
end

I have everything up to "it finds an entry" and that is where I've run into trouble. My code so far looks like this. And a thank you to everyone on this site who has helped me build that code.

class Dictionary
  attr_accessor :keywords, :entries

  def initialize 
    @entries = {}
  end

  def add(defs)
    defs.each do |word, definition|
      @entries[word] = definition
    end      
  end

  def keywords
    @entries.keys.sort
  end

  def include?(key)
    @entries.key?(key)
  end 

  def find(query)
    @entries.select { |word, definition| word.scan(query).join == query}  
  end    
end

and the error I'm getting on that test is:

1) Dictionary finds an entry
     Failure/Error: @d.find('fish').should == {'fish' => 'aquatic animal'}
       expected: {"fish"=>"aquatic animal"}
            got: [["fish", "aquatic animal"]] (using ==)
       Diff:
       @@ -1,2 +1,2 @@
       -"fish" => "aquatic animal"
       +[["fish", "aquatic animal"]]

So it looks like it's an issue with the output from the finder method being an Array and not a Hash. What would be the best way to go about fixing that? Thank you in advance!

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1  
Next time, consider making your question minimal; there's no need for you full implementation and spec here. –  Marc-André Lafortune Mar 7 '13 at 16:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You must be using a fairly old version of Ruby.

In Ruby 1.8.7:

{}.select{} # => []

With the latest Ruby:

{}.select{} # => {}

You could:

  • upgrade Ruby to 1.9.2+
  • use reject instead and inverse your condition
  • or use my backports gem and require 'backports/force/hash/select' to get the same behavior in Ruby 1.8.x.
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Try taking the result returned by select and doing:

Hash[result]

Or more primitively, just make a hash!

{result.first.first => result.first.last}
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