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#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

    int GenerateID()
    {
        using namespace std;
        static int nNextID = 0;
        nNextID++;
        if (nNextID <= 20)
        cout << nNextID << endl;
    }

int main()
{
    int GenerateID();
    system("pause");
}

why isn't the above program running? I want it to generate on the console numbers from 1-20 with this program.

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3  
Too many mistakes to tell here. Get yourself a C++ book/tutorial. –  m0skit0 Mar 7 '13 at 16:09
    
where is the loop to print all numbers? –  Mario The Spoon Mar 7 '13 at 16:10
2  
system("pause") always depresses me. stackoverflow.com/q/1107705/10077 –  Fred Larson Mar 7 '13 at 16:11
1  
@m0skit0: Might as well link the The Definitive C++ Book Guide and List. –  Fred Larson Mar 7 '13 at 16:15
1  
Jossie, what do you observe that leads you to believe that it is not running? What do you expect the output to be, and what output do you observe? Does it crash? Does it have any compiler errors or warnings? –  Robᵩ Mar 7 '13 at 16:26
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closed as not a real question by m0skit0, 0x499602D2, Ed Heal, Tadeusz Kopec, sashoalm Mar 7 '13 at 16:38

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5 Answers

Your main function should be this:

int main()
{
    GenerateID();
    system("pause");
}
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And return 0;. Also he cannot print the numbers 1-20 without loops (in a trivial manner). –  m0skit0 Mar 7 '13 at 16:10
    
I resolved it. Thanks guys, I didn't notice the small mistake. –  Jossie Calderon Mar 7 '13 at 16:11
7  
@m0skit0: No return statement is needed for main, it's special. –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 7 '13 at 16:12
1  
@m0skit0: successful return is implicit, it's not needed. –  Kerrek SB Mar 7 '13 at 16:12
    
Only main() does not need return? Looks like an awful behavior decision to make... In which standard was this added? And what is the logic behind this decision? –  m0skit0 Mar 7 '13 at 16:15
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In main, you didn't call the function. You merely declared it.

Do this instead :

GenerateID();

(ie. without the int).

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int GenerateID() in main declares a new function, it doesn't call the function you wrote earlier.

In order you call your function, simply use GenerateID();. By the way, your function does not return anything, so there is little point in its return type being declared int - use void.

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int GenerateID();

is not a function call. This is a function declaration that defines the return type and the parameters of the function. This will not call the GenerateID function, it will only allow everything under that definition to use the function properly (which is quite redundant here as you're already declaring and defining the function above int main in the first place.)

To fix this, you should do:

GenerateID();

That would be a proper function call. Also, why are you not returning 0 at the end of int main? The return value of int main() on Windows allows the OS to tell whether the execution was successful or not. I don't know if this applies to other Operating Systems as well, but it likely should. (Currently, it functions correctly, but I think explicitly returning 0 at the end makes more sense.)


I'd recommend moving your

using namespace std;

line to the top of the code. It doesn't belong inside that function's body.

I'd also like to warn you about the use of the system function. For fast and simple testing purposes, usage is totally fine, but since this function is very Operating System Dependent, I would recommend living without it.

An alternative to system("pause") would be:

std::cin.get();

(It will not display the text, but you really don't need that either way) (Thank you David)

I hope this helps!

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1  
Or you can simply use std::cin.get() instead. –  0x499602D2 Mar 7 '13 at 16:24
    
That works too. I'll edit my answer. –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun Mar 7 '13 at 16:25
    
Why do you say that using namespace std; doesn't belong inside the function's body, but rather at the global scope? Sounds like a terrible recommendation to me. Limiting the scope of that statement should be encouraged. –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 7 '13 at 16:33
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  • Remove the int keyword in front of the call to GenerateID() in main.

  • wrap that very call with a loop:

    for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) 
        GenerateID();
    

Optionally:

  • replace your system function call by one of the solutions offered to this question,

  • separate the code to display the id from the one generating it:

    int GenerateID() {
        static int id = 0;
        return id++;
    }
    
    int main(){
        using namespace std;
        for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
            cout << GenerateID() << endl;
        // here the code for console pausing
        return 0;
    }
    
  • it is good practice to have your main function return a value at exit (pretty much like any function returning something), as in the code above,

  • remove the implicit namespace usages, and make all uses explicit. Personnally, as long as the implicit usage is segregated to very specific parts of the code, I don't see it as a problem, but if your code is getting sufficiently large, you might want to use that feature carefully. In this setup, it's clearly not necessary.

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