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I have the following data:

measurement <- c(1:30)
angle <- rnorm(30, 0, 0.4)
data.1 <- data.frame(measurement, angle)

And I want to make a function that returns a TRUE value for four different scenarios:

   1. When 'angle' >  0.3 
or 2. When 'angle' < -0.3 
or 3. When 'angle' + the previous 'angle' >  0.3 
or 4. When 'angle' + the previous 'angle' < -0.3 

I tried it with a for loop, and I've tried it the following way, but I just don't know how to include the sum of the angle and the angle that is measured one time-step earlier (so what i'm doing here is wrong but how can i improve it? preferably on the computationally least strenuous way because I work with massive data-sets):

n<-data.1$angle
function1 <- function(n){
    return(n>0.3 | n<(-0.3) | (n+(n-1))>(0.3) | (n+(n-1))<(-0.3))
}

Sorry for being an R novice but after strolling through the labyrinth of R documentation I saw no other way but to ask it here. Thanks for helping!

share|improve this question
    
you're not including the previous angle. you are subtracting 1 from the current angle. your function would need two parameters the way you' re implementing it, First, the angle and Second, angle at previous index (or just index). –  Arun Mar 7 '13 at 16:35
    
Thanks Arun, that was exactly what I didn't know how to do, although your solution below is definitely much more elegant. If I where to use the method I wrote, how would I have to 'parameterize' the angle at previous index? And in you method below, what is the use of the 0 in the c() function? (trying to learn the most out of it here:) –  Joeri Mar 7 '13 at 17:38
    
The purpose of 0 is to add it to the first element of data.1$angle. Since you are adding it to the previous angle, the first angle won't have a previous one. So, I add 0. –  Arun Mar 7 '13 at 17:40
    
For the function.. it would have to be something like: function(ang, ang.idx) { abs(ang) > 0.3 | abs(ang + ang[ang.idx-1]) > 0.3. Here, I've not checked for the condition ang.idx-1 = 0. then ang[0] will result in integer(0) which is not the result you want. So, you'll have to take care of the condition. I'll leave it to you. –  Arun Mar 7 '13 at 17:43
    
However, it is not an efficient way to do it. It is good probably to get the satisfaction of getting what you started done. –  Arun Mar 7 '13 at 17:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can do it in a vectorised format instead of doing it for each angle one by one.

abs(data.1$angle) > 0.3 | abs(data.1$angle + c(0, head(data.1$angle,-1))) > 0.3

abs(data.1$angle) > 0.3 - the first and second conditions.
abs(data.1$angle + c(0, head(data.1$angle,-1))) > 0.3 - takes all angles and adds the previous angle to it using c(0, head(., -1)). Then again check with abs for 0.3 and -0.3

I get:

# [1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE
# [15]  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE
# [29]  TRUE  TRUE
share|improve this answer
1  
+1. I was just trying something with diff, but it wasn't working out as expected. –  Ananda Mahto Mar 7 '13 at 16:36
    
+1 for head(x,-1) –  Chinmay Patil Mar 7 '13 at 17:18

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