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I've got this jQuery, which is obviously not working:

$('input.descriptionLC').click(function(){
    $('.collapse').collapse('hide')
});

My html is being generated by this for loop / append:

for (i=0; i < nodeArr.length; i++){
  $('#accordion2').append('<div class="accordion-group">' +
  '<div class="accordion-heading">' +
    '<a class="accordion-toggle" data-toggle="collapse" data-parent="#accordion2" href="#collapse' + i + '">' +  
        '<hr class="inLC">' +
        '<div class="divLC">' +
            '<p class="titleLC">' + nodeArr[i][0] + '</p>' +
            '<p class="imgWrap"><img class="imgLC" src="img/On_slider.png"></p>' +
            '<input type="text" class="descriptionLC" id="description' + i + '">' +
        '</div>' +    
    '</a>' +
  '</div>' +
  '<div id="collapse' + i + '" class="accordion-body collapse">' +
    '<div class="accordion-inner">' +
      'Anim pariatur cliche...' +
    '</div>' +
  '</div>' +
  '</div>'
  );
}
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2 Answers 2

Jquery

$('body').on('click', 'input.descriptionLC', function(e){
    $('.collapse').collapse('hide');
});

See jQuery on docs

share|improve this answer
    
No, nonono, You are never supposed to bind events to document!!! –  Christian Stewart Mar 7 '13 at 16:39
    
On is way more efficient... –  Christian Stewart Mar 7 '13 at 16:40
    
Really ? I thought it was replacing the live event like that ? –  soyuka Mar 7 '13 at 16:40
    
No, they replaced all of those old events using .on –  Christian Stewart Mar 7 '13 at 16:40
    
so I should better bind the 'body' instead of the document ? Thanks for that ! –  soyuka Mar 7 '13 at 16:41

You want to use .on instead of .click as your DOM is changing.

See this answer. .on will (and should) be used to watch the parent of the changing area for changes; once the changes have been executed it will automatically rebind all of the events to the selected subelements (with the filter). In that answer I give a more detailed description of how to use it.

In short, though this is inefficient (you should change body to some div containing just the changing part of the DOM):

$('body').on("click", 'input.descriptionLC', function(e){
      $('.collapse').collapse('hide')
});

if you want just the following accordion item:

$('body').on("click", 'input.descriptionLC', function(e){
      $(this).next('.collapse').collapse('hide')
});
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know why, but for some reason, this opens all the accordions on the page, 30+. –  watson Mar 7 '13 at 16:42
    
Yes, this will open all of the documents, as you're selecting .collapse for the entire page. If you want just the next one... editing answer –  Christian Stewart Mar 7 '13 at 16:42
    
?? I want to make none of them open. –  watson Mar 7 '13 at 16:44
    
Your question contains code that is obviously meant to open when clicking the thing. If you want to UNBIND that, you can use $('input.descriptionLC').unbind() –  Christian Stewart Mar 7 '13 at 16:45
    
Someone edited my title, but the whole point was to make none of them open when the input is active. –  watson Mar 7 '13 at 17:06

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