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If I write

#define ANOTHER_CONSTANT 200
#define MYDIVISOR 1000/ANOTHER_CONSTANT

and then a method

- (void)result {
    NSRange range = [@"--BB-------A----" rangeOfString:@"A" options:NSBackwardsSearch];
    int rest = range.location % MYDIVISOR;
    NSLog(@"Rest is %i", rest);
}

the output is always that rest is 0, no matter where the A occurs. I have solved it by storing the MYDIVISOR into an intermediate integer variable, but I would like to know why it does not work with the predefined constant. Any ideas?

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1 Answer 1

This is because you did not put parentheses around your MYDIVISOR definition:

#define MYDIVISOR (1000/ANOTHER_CONSTANT)

Without parentheses, the code will look like this after the substitution by the preprocessor:

int rest = range.location % 1000 / ANOTHER_CONSTANT;

Because % and / have the same priority and are applied left-to-right, the compiler would generate the code that obtains a remainder of the division by 1000, and then quickly divide the result by 200, which is certainly not what you'd expect.

In general, it is a good idea to always put parentheses around your entire macro. In case of function-like macros with parameters, it is also a good idea to parenthesize each parameter as well.

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1  
There is also a potential problem if the integer constants don't divide evenly. –  rmaddy Mar 7 '13 at 17:37
    
If he changes to float/double then % will not work. –  Anoop Vaidya Mar 7 '13 at 17:43

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