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I have a XML like this -

<DOCUMENT>
<SERVICE>
<ID>1338</ID>
<NAME>
&lt;EN&gt;this is an english name&lt;/EN&gt;
&lt;DE&gt;this is a german name&lt;/DE&gt;
</NAME>
</SERVICE>
</DOCUMENT>

As you can see the elements inside the name tag are XML like but not really formatted as elements. The output XML needs to look like

<SERVICES>
<SERVICE ID="1338" EN="this is an english name" DE="this is a german name"/>
</SERVICES> 

I am trying to get the value of the EN and DE through XPATH. I have tried to playaround with disable-output-escaping but I dont think that will work.

<xsl:template match="/">
<SERVICES>
<SERVICE>
<xsl:attribute name="ID"><xsl:value-of select="DOCUMENT/SERVICE/ID"/></xsl:attribute>
<xsl:attribute name="EN"><xsl:value-of select="DOCUMENT/SERVICE/NAME/EN" disable-output-escaping="yes"/></xsl:attribute>
<xsl:attribute name="DE"><xsl:value-of select="DOCUMENT/SERVICE/NAME/DE" disable-output-escaping="yes"/></xsl:attribute>
</SERVICE>
</SERVICES>
</xsl:template>

Any suggestions here?

share|improve this question
    
do you think substring() could be applied here or would your source be too dynamic? Have you tried output escaping yet? – JWiley Mar 7 '13 at 16:53
    
Which XSLT processor do you use? Does it have an extension function like Saxon 9 for instance with saxonica.com/documentation/functions/intro/parse-xml.xml? – Martin Honnen Mar 7 '13 at 17:43
    
I dont have an extension like Saxon9.. its a plain built-in transformation server in our Search engine. – user1766784 Mar 7 '13 at 17:48
    
JWiley, yes, I can substring but thought if there might be any cleaner way to achieve it – user1766784 Mar 7 '13 at 17:49
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The preferred approach is to take the string content of the NAME element and put it through an XML parser to turn it into a node tree. This can be done if your processor supports an extension such as saxon:parse() (or XPath 3.0 parse-xml()), or by calling out to an extension function.

If the internal XML is very stereotyped and predictable, then you could perhaps parse it by direct string manipulation.

share|improve this answer

If you are able to use XSLT 2.0, take advantage of some of their parsing functions. You could use analyze-string to pull out the data that you need.

Below should be a full working transformation.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="2.0">
    <xsl:template match="/">
        <DOCUMENT>
            <SERVICES>
                <xsl:for-each select="DOCUMENT/SERVICE">
                    <SERVICE>
                        <xsl:attribute name="ID"><xsl:value-of select="ID"/></xsl:attribute>
                        <xsl:analyze-string select="NAME" regex="&lt;(.*?)&gt;(.*?)&lt;/\1&gt;">
                            <xsl:matching-substring>
                                <xsl:attribute name="{regex-group(1)}" select="regex-group(2)"/>
                            </xsl:matching-substring>
                        </xsl:analyze-string>
                    </SERVICE>
                </xsl:for-each>
            </SERVICES>
        </DOCUMENT>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. But I use XSLT 1.0, so this answer isnt going to help me too much I am afraid. – user1766784 Mar 7 '13 at 17:48

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