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I have two classes

public class ABC {
    public void test() {
       Car a = new Car();
       a.start();
    }
}

public class DEF {
    public void test() {
       Car a = new Car();
       a.start();
       a.stop();
    }
}

Now both these classes do pretty much the same thing, how can extract out the commonality, or what is the best way.. would a template method work.. where by i use an interface... and have one parent method that calls an abstract method that is implemented on the subclasses?... but that would mean that one class has a no operation in a method?

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5 Answers 5

Yes you can use template method pattern here:

public abstract class Template {

    public void test() {
       Car a = new Car();
       a.start();
       if(shouldStop()) {
           a.stop();
       }
    }

    public abstract boolean shouldStop();

}

public class ABC extends Template {

    public boolean shouldStop() {
        return false;
    }

}

public class DEF extends Template {

    public boolean shouldStop() {
        return true;
    }

}

Here you are adding a hook to allow subclasses to stop if they wish. You can obviously extends this to include any other optional functionality.

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I kind of depends on what else you have beyond this trivial example, but you could do something like this:

public class ABC {
    public Car test() {
       Car a = new Car();
       a.start();
       return a;
    }

}

public class DEF extends ABC {
    public Car test() {
       Car a = super.test();
       a.stop();
    }
}
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The template method is usefull when you have steps that should be shared for all subclasses.

Template Method Wiki

The basic structure is what you already said. An abstract class with some abstract methods which have to be implemented by subclasses.

Interfaces, in the other hand, defines an API, not a behavior. So it's useless in this case.

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Okay, so you've got commonalities in the methods:

Car a = new Car();
a.start();

What you can do, is make an abstract class, that both of these classes extend.

public abstract class ParentClass
{
      public void test()
      {
              Car a = new Car();
              a.start();
      }
}

Then from your subclasses, you can call: super.test();. This will call the method in the parent class, before returning to the current method and finishing off the subclass implementation.

Advantages of this method

Any common code in these classes can now be pulled out, and placed inside the ParentClass. This means no repetition of code, which is always good. It also means that your class has logical structure, provided the superclass functions appropriately. This, again, is considered good practice because it makes your code more semantically logical.

Disadvantages of this method

The ParentClass is the ONLY class that the other classes can extend. This is called Inheritance and multiple Inheritance is something that Java does not support, so keep this in mind. If your ABC also shared similar functionality with another set of classes, then you might want to re-think your class structure.

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Generally, and as much as possible, I prefer to put common functionalities in external (and static) methods, mainly for two reasons (they are very slightly different and related):

  1. I prefer avoiding to keep my "inheritance slot", I can inherit from just one class and I want to be greed in extending, using it when very necessary or in the appropriate case (see point 2);

  2. Inheritance should be used only where there's a relation of "type of" between classes; anyway, I personally believe that in Java you could be coerced, in some cases, to use inheritance in a wrong way because the Java language doesn't offer a mechanism for sharing common functionalities (such as modules in ruby).

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